The heartening news is that most people can effectively control their blood pressure without the need for medications by following a healthy lifestyle like the Pritikin Program.  “Those who still need medications usually require a lower dose and/or fewer drugs, thereby reducing their risk of suffering adverse side effects from the medications,” states Dr. Fruge.
While medication can lower blood pressure, it may cause side effects such as leg cramps, dizziness, and insomnia. The good news is that most people can bring their numbers down naturally without drugs. “Lifestyle changes are an important part of prevention and treatment of high blood pressure,” says Brandie D. Williams, MD, FACC, a cardiologist at Texas Health Stephenville and Texas Health Physicians Group.
Raw almonds: Consuming a handful of raw almonds can make a significant difference in your blood pressure. Almonds are considered a key component of the DASH diet—dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet—as they are rich in monounsaturated fats scientifically proven to lower cholesterol, reduce arterial inflammation, and lower blood pressure. It is important to note that almonds are high in fat and calories, but when eaten as part of a healthy lifestyle, they may actually promote weight loss and muscle growth.
It’s a common question among our guests at the Pritikin Longevity Center, who are taught how devastating the high-salt U.S. diet is to our blood pressure and overall health. Searching for alternatives, people often ask: What about salt substitutes with potassium? And what about MSG? Isn’t it a bad choice? Here are answers, some of which may surprise you.
High blood pressure over an extended period can lead to potentially dangerous complications. This can cause damage to organs, leading to microalbuminuria, cognitive dysfunction, and left-ventricular hypertrophy, as noted by one study. Additionally, the risk of renal failure, dementia and suffering a heart attack also dramatically increases in the population with elevated blood pressure levels.
There are more worrisome facts about medications, notes Dr. Fruge.  Drug treatment frequently has annoying and sometimes dangerous side effects, and never cures the disease.  All too often, blood pressure problems grow progressively worse despite the use of medications.  That’s deeply troubling because hypertension is a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, and premature death.
Dear Dr. Kernisan, you don’t know how thrilled I am to hear back from you!! There seems to be so little kindness these days that I so appreciate your caring response. I have had little success finding information about malignant hypertension. You mentioned following up was a lot of work, but it has been so consuming for me due to my fear, but also trying for a decent quality of life with as few side effects as possible, that my daughter says I need to find something else to do. (I have no other family left)…Besides a very stressful job, and caregiving for my mother who lived to be 97, I have always done volunteer work, so am really ready to get back to being productive…As far as my malignant spikes, I have asked every doctor and no one has an answer as to why it suddenly developed. That is one reason it is so scary. The nephrologist says he guesses it was from years of chronic stress. All the tests (kidney and carotid artery) were negative. I do a ton of research and am so glad to have found your site!! I found you through a link in a Washington Post article by Janice Neumann on August 17 “New Blood Pressure Guidelines Can Cause Problems for the Elderly”… I did not find a way to contact her. I have had no luck finding similar patients but need to learn social media skills. Thank you again so much!!!! I will be a faithful follower from now on!!! Best Regards, Kathy

A SBP above 140 is not “alarming” per se, but historically this has been the cutoff separating “high” blood pressure from normal or “bordeline” blood pressure. Many doctors do still believe that older adults should be encouraged to get their SBP below 140, and in the SPRINT blood pressure trial, one group of participants actually aimed to get their SBP below 120.


We've got a bit of a different podcast today for you Guys & Gals, but it's still a goodie, and jam packed with exciting information. The Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences, Dr. Dean Radin, joins us to discuss his expertise on real magic and how can it optimize performance for everyone. Dr. Radin is the author of many books, but his newest, titled Real Magic, delves into the worlds of telepathy and psychokinesis; which he explains may not solely be powers of the imagination. Enjoy!
I am a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with hbp about 5 years ago. I also have degenerative arthritis in my hips, in particular,and have had to keep up with strength training exercises over the past 20 years to ward off the pain. When first diagnosed with hpb, my doctor put me on Benicar. It helped immediately but I also began to experience some severe muscle and joint pain in my hips and legs. She switched me to Valsartan and the pain abided for about 2 months. Then came back again. Fast forward to last fall when I had a left hip replacement. Recovery was slow, especially for my age. I kept stumping the PT as to why my muscle tension was so tight. Finally, after I started working out at the gym, my pain resided. Counter intuitive, I know. Now I am scheduled to have a right hip replacement in November 2018 and am experiencing intermittent excruciating pain in my quads and tibia. I’ve been reading about an uncommon side effect of bp meds being muscle and joint pain. I’m wondering how much the bp meds are contributing to my pain. Would it be unreasonable to try switching bp meds every 3/4 months? Thank you for any advice you can provide.
High blood pressure, or hypertension, is the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Damage to your blood vessels occurs every time your pressure is elevated, and the new guidelines are meant to help people become more aware earlier.  And through earlier awareness, it may help prevent the damage that would occur if you waited for a later diagnosis.

The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet has been proven best for controlling blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association.  People who follow the diet eat 2,000 calories a day of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and whole grains. The diet is rich in potassium, magnesium and calcium, as well as protein and fiber, and low in sodium. Foods on the diet are low in saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol.


It's time to heed your partner's complaints and get that snoring checked out. Loud, incessant snores are a symptom of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder characterized by brief yet potentially life-threatening interruptions in breathing during sleep. And many sleep apnea sufferers also have high levels of aldosterone, a hormone that can boost blood pressure, according to University of Alabama researchers. In fact, it's estimated that sleep apnea affects half of people with high blood pressure.
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