Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of arteries. When the doctor measures your blood pressure, the results are given in two numbers. The first number, called systolic blood pressure, is the pressure caused by your heart contracting and pushing out blood. The second number, called diastolic blood pressure, is the pressure when your heart relaxes and fills with blood. Your blood pressure reading is usually given as the systolic blood pressure number over the diastolic blood pressure number, such as 138/72. Normal blood pressure for adults is defined as a systolic pressure of less than 120 and a diastolic pressure of less than 80. This is stated as 120/80.
As explained by Dr. Rosedale, insulin stores magnesium. If your insulin receptors are blunted and your cells grow resistant to insulin, you can't store magnesium so it passes out of your body through urination. Magnesium stored in your cells relaxes muscles. If your magnesium level is too low, your blood vessels will constrict rather than relax, which will raise your blood pressure and decrease your energy level. Insulin also affects your blood pressure by causing your body to retain sodium. Sodium retention causes fluid retention. Fluid retention in turn causes high blood pressure and can ultimately lead to congestive heart failure. If your hypertension is the direct result of an out-of-control blood sugar level, then normalizing your blood sugar levels will also lower your blood pressure readings into the healthy range.
If you are in this 130/80 range, reducing your blood pressure can help protect you from heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, eye disease, and even cognitive decline. The goal of the new guidelines is to encourage you to treat your high blood pressure seriously and to take action to bring it down, primarily using lifestyle interventions. "It is well documented that lifestyle changes can lower blood pressure as much as pills can, and sometimes even more," says Dr. Fisher.
Be Mindful. Studies show that a regular meditation practice can help manage hypertension. So create your own practice: Mindfully brush your hair or rub lotion on your arms and legs. Or simply repeat a mantra with your eyes closed and your body in a relaxed posture. Being mindful means focusing on all of the sensations of the present moment (touch, smell, and sound), such as movement of a brush through your hair.

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Having a bad day can impair our judgment and lead to most of us making not-so-wise lifestyle choices like binge eating, smoking, or drinking. These unhealthy habits done in excess can negatively affect our health, especially our blood pressure. As one in four Americans continue to suffer from the epidemic of high blood pressure, it is imperative for us to effectively avoid and reduce this highly preventable disease associated with heart attack and stroke, aneurysms, cognitive decline, and kidney failure. Fortunately, there are ways to bring down blood pressure without the use of medication.
If you have a moderate case of hypertension, you can often normalize your blood pressure by consciously supporting healthy, holistic lifestyle choices. Building awareness of your diet, activity levels, and stress levels is essential. Once you know what triggers high blood pressure, you can incorporate pre-modern techniques to prevent blood pressure from reaching the point where it requires drug intervention.
I totally agree with you that we should not rely on medication for high blood pressure. End of the day, high blood pressure is a symptom that our body requires immediate attention. The kidneys work extremely hard to send out the “signal” to us and what we did is to pop a high blood pressure pill to suppress the signal. With this medication, our body has to work even harder to send us another signal. No wonder over the long run people who are suffering from high blood pressure needs an additional pill for deteriorating kidneys. Our body is fully capable of healing itself without us realizing it. I strongly encourage high blood pressure sufferers to listen to this and say goodbye to high blood pressure once and for all:
Researchers from Spain, Portugal, Iceland, and Ireland published a study in the journal Nutrition that looked at the impact of a diet including fish on diastolic blood pressure among overweight or obese young adults on a weight loss diet. Eating fatty fish such as salmon (but not leaner fish, such as cod) three times a week was linked with a reduction in diastolic blood pressure over eight weeks. The researchers say that many previous studies have found that omega-3 fatty acids (found naturally in fish) have a blood pressure-lowering effect.
Meditate or take slow, steady deep breaths to calm the nervous system, relax and your dilate blood vessels. Breathing exercises help calm your sympathetic nervous system and your fight-or-flight response. This technique also encourages blood flow to your body’s tissues and causes your diaphragm to move up and down, which eases blood flow to your heart.
Bananas are one great source of potassium, but there are other tasty ways to get your fill. Potatoes actually pack more potassium than the yellow fruit (and you might be surprised to learn there are plenty of other health benefits of potatoes, too). Sweet potatoes, tomatoes, orange juice, kidney beans, peas, cantaloupe, honeydew, and dried fruits like prunes or raisins are other good sources. In all, you should aim to get 2,000 to 4,000 mg of potassium a day, Van Horn recommends.
If you suddenly find yourself with high blood pressure (hypertension) under the new guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, you might be wondering what to do. The guidelines, which were released in November, lowered the definition for high blood pressure to 130/80 from 140/90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), meaning more women now meet the criteria for stage 1 hypertension.
Magnesium supplements were found to modestly lower blood pressure—by about 2 points in both systolic and diastolic pressure—in a 2016 analysis of 34 clini­cal trials. A 2017 analysis of 11 clinical trials reached a similar conclusion. It looked at the effect of magnesium supplements (365 to 450 milligrams a day) on blood pressure in people with diabetes, prediabetes, or insulin resistance. But supplements aren’t necessary to get those levels of magnesium; a healthy diet supplies plenty of the mineral. For the best sources of magnesium, see the chart here.
Drugs and medication: Certain drugs and medication can also lead to high blood pressure. Some forms, like birth control, are associated with long-term high blood pressure, while common over-the-counter medications—typically painkillers like “Aspirin,” ibuprofen, “Advil,” and “Motrin”—can all lead to acute spikes. This could be due to the presence of caffeine.
Ocean Robbins is the author of 31-Day Food Revolution: Heal Your Body, Feel Great, and Transform Your World (Grand Central Life & Style, February 5, 2019). He is the CEO and co-founder of the 500,000+ member Food Revolution Network. He's served as the adjunct professor for Chapman University. And he's received numerous awards, including the national Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service and the Freedom's Flame Award. Ocean Robbins
Exercise. Some patients will cringe at the suggestion of exercise, because they envision a chronic cardio scenario like a mouse on a running wheel. Spread the good news: exercise of all kinds—endurance, dynamic resistance, HIIT, isometric resistance—has the potential to reduce blood pressure (38). Whatever exercise your patients will actually do on a regular basis is the best recipe for success. In patients with extreme hypertension, be cautious with exercises that may further increase blood pressure to an unsafe zone (39).
Eighty million U.S. adults, or one in three, have hypertension (1). Another one in three have prehypertension, defined as blood pressure in the range of 120–139/80–89 mmHg. In addition to costing $48.6 billion annually, hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure, and stroke (1). Even prehypertension increases the risk of death from CVD (2). Because of its severity, hypertension requires immediate treatment, but prescription drugs may not be the answer.
Mistletoe is on the list of home remedies for high blood pressure because it lowers blood pressure. It works best for symptoms attributable to mild elevations in blood pressure, such as headaches, circulatory problems, dizziness, irritability, and anxiety. Prepare mistletoe tea cold. Mix 1 cup of water per 1 teaspoon of dried mistletoe. Allow the mixture to sit for 8-10 hours (overnight) and drink 1-2 cups per day.

None of the home remedies for high blood pressure will be as effective as eliminating your choices that affect your blood pressure. For example, smoking or chewing tobacco immediately raises your blood pressure. While the increase is often temporary, it can still permanently damage the lining of your artery walls. The damage can result in more narrow arteries, which increases blood pressure.
For a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University looked at how drinking three daily servings of hibiscus tea over six weeks changed blood pressure in people with pre-hypertension or mild high blood pressure. They found reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, especially in people with higher systolic blood pressure to start. Hibiscus tea is loaded with antioxidants, including phenols and anthocyanins, which might explain the effect.
Too much pressure from the daily grind gives you stress and stress is really bad for your health. One of the bad effects of stress is high blood pressure. Try to manage your stress and it will lower your blood pressure naturally. Resting and sleeping in complete hours can lower blood pressure. Doing relaxing activities also lower blood pressure. Do some yoga and meditation to reduce the stress level and enjoy a health life.
Also, be sure that the quality chocolate has large quantities (a minimum of 70%) of cocoa - the active ingredient that lowers the blood pressure. Cocoa has antioxidant-rich compounds called flavanoids, which help dilate blood vessels and assist in glucose metabolism. Surprisingly, dark chocolate contains more of these antioxidant compounds than even the famed blueberry.
3. Quit smoking and alcohol: Because, neither of the two is of any benefit to your health. What's more is that smoking is listed as a causative factor for almost all diseases. You name a disease, and smoking will be a contributing factor to it. Alcohol, on the other hand, has direct links with increasing blood pressure. No amount of alcohol intake is safe or healthy for men or women.
High blood pressure is a common health issue with so many people. It is also called as hypertension, a persistent medical condition that takes place, when there is a high pressure of the blood in the arteries. Usually, the blood pressure is measured by the diastolic and systolic movements. High blood pressure is considered, if the reading is at or above 140/90 mmHg. 
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