The stronger the heart, the more efficiently it can perform.  Those who are physically active and exercise regularly are far more likely to maintain healthy blood pressure than those who do not.  According to the American Heart Association, 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity three to four times per week is all it takes on average to help reduce high blood pressure.


When you get a high blood pressure reading at the doctor's office, it might be tough for you to understand exactly what impact those numbers can make on your overall health, since high blood pressure has no unusual day-to-day symptoms. But the truth is, having high blood pressure is a serious health risk—it boosts the risks of leading killers such as heart attack and stroke, as well as aneurysms, cognitive decline, and kidney failure. What's more, high blood pressure is a primary or contributing cause of death in more than 1,000 deaths a day in the United States.
The normal blood pressure is supposed to be around 120/80 mm Hg (or a little lower). However, when the blood pressure is 130/90 mm Hg or 140/90 mm Hg, the person is said to have hypertension or high blood pressure. In stage I hypertension, the systolic pressure is between 140-159 mm Hg, while the diastolic pressure is between 90-99 mm Hg. In stage II hypertension, the systolic blood pressure is 160 mm Hg or higher, and the diastolic reading is 100 mm Hg or higher. Figures like 200/110 mm Hg indicate severe hypertension.

Consuming dark chocolate or cocoa products rich in flavanols was linked with some reduction in systolic or diastolic blood pressure among people with hypertension or pre-hypertension (but not normal blood pressure), according to a meta-analysis in BMC Medicine. Other research has shown that polyphenols (especially flavanols) in cocoa products are associated with the formation of nitric oxide, a substance that widens blood vessels and eases blood flow—and thereby lowers blood pressure. According to the researchers, future studies should investigate whether genetics plays a role.
Once you are diagnosed with hypertension, the doctor will advise you to take hypertension medication that will help keep your blood pressure within the normal range. However, medicines come with side effects. So, one looks for remedies to lower blood pressure without medication. There are many things that you could do to keep your blood pressure normal. Let us have a look at the various remedies that will help you in reducing blood pressure fast. These simple home remedies may reduce your need for medication. Less medication means less side effects. 

Ginger, the spicy root often used in Asian cooking, could also help lower blood pressure. According to M. Jan Ghayur and A. Gilani from The Aga Khan University Medical College in Pakistan and published in the January 2005 issue of the "Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology," ginger can reduce blood pressure by blocking the voltage-dependent calcium channels. MedlinePlus agrees that ginger does reduce high blood pressure, but individuals who take medication for their high blood pressure should use ginger with precaution because ginger might lower it too much or cause an irregular heartbeat.
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension looked at how olive oil might affect blood pressure in young women with mild high blood pressure. Spanish researchers compared a diet of polyphenol-rich olive oil to a diet that didn't contain any polyphenols and their effects on blood pressure over a period of four months. The results: The polyphenol-rich olive oil was linked with drops in systolic and diastolic blood pressure—especially among women with higher blood pressure to start.
“We have many people with hypertension who come to Pritikin,” says Pritikin’s Associate Medical Director Danine Fruge, MD, “and within three days, many have blood pressures that have dropped so low that we need to reduce their medications or take them off their pills altogether. Yes, just three days. That’s how quickly and powerfully our bodies respond to healthy food, exercise, and other lifestyle changes.”

You bet. As reported by ABC World News on September 16, 20103, one cardiologist believes the connection between stress and hypertension is undeniable, yet still does not receive the emphasis it deserves. In response, Dr. Kennedy developed a stress-relieving technique he calls "The 15 Minute Heart Cure," a set of breathing and creative visualization techniques that can be done anywhere, anytime. The technique is demonstrated in the ABC World News video above. By teaching your body to slow down and relax when stress hits -- essentially short-circuiting your physical stress reaction -- you can protect your health.
Dr. Palanismy notes that a particular form of stress reduction called Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction has been proven in research studies to reduce blood pressure. This approach to stress reduction uses meditation, body awareness and movement such as yoga to help people better observe their experiences, instead of being completely immersed in them. This helps them take a step back in stressful situations. 

Patients may be rushed and anxious when they’re in the doctor’s office, resulting in higher-than-normal blood pressure readings. Home monitors let patients measure and record blood pressure throughout the day for greater accuracy. Patients can keep a log of their numbers and bring the log and the monitor to their doctor’s appointment to check for accuracy.
Celery consists of high levels of phytochemical that helps you to lower blood pressure level. Eat celery daily to see the best results in your blood pressure level. It also helps you lower stress hormones that constricts the blood vessels, which is one of the causes of high blood pressure. If you like celery, then you can chew on some to lower blood pressure naturally.
Although certain supplements may be helpful, it's important to understand they should never be used as a substitute for basic lifestyle choices that treat the real cause of the problem. Using only supplements without modifying your lifestyle is an allopathic approach not very different from using drugs. In most instances, it is not likely to be effective. Once you have made some beneficial changes to your lifestyle, you can then consider some of the following supplements as a way to further enhance your health:
Sipping on not one but four cups of tea daily can help control blood pressure. A study presented at the European Society of Hyper tension in Milan found those who avoided coffee and tea consumption all together had the highest rates of blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Those who drank tea the most often, between one to four cups a day, had the lowest systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings, as well as the lowest pulse pressure and heart rate. Pinkies up, for your blood pressure’s sake.
Too much pressure from the daily grind gives you stress and stress is really bad for your health. One of the bad effects of stress is high blood pressure. Try to manage your stress and it will lower your blood pressure naturally. Resting and sleeping in complete hours can lower blood pressure. Doing relaxing activities also lower blood pressure. Do some yoga and meditation to reduce the stress level and enjoy a health life.
In a review and analysis of various studies published in the Journal of Human Hypertension, Australian researchers found a link between the consumption of low-fat  dairy and a reduced risk of hypertension. This was seen most strongly with low-fat yogurt and milk (but not cheese). Though calcium may play a role, it's more likely other components of dairy that protect, including compounds such as peptides, released during digestion. Why high-fat dairy may not protect isn't yet clear, but the saturated fat could be to blame. People who consume low-fat dairy also simply may have a healthier overall lifestyle.
You bet. As reported by ABC World News on September 16, 20103, one cardiologist believes the connection between stress and hypertension is undeniable, yet still does not receive the emphasis it deserves. In response, Dr. Kennedy developed a stress-relieving technique he calls "The 15 Minute Heart Cure," a set of breathing and creative visualization techniques that can be done anywhere, anytime. The technique is demonstrated in the ABC World News video above. By teaching your body to slow down and relax when stress hits -- essentially short-circuiting your physical stress reaction -- you can protect your health.
Even if you don’t keep a salt shaker on the table, you may have too much sodium in your diet. Processed foods -- especially canned soups, salad dressings, snack mixes, and fast food -- are a large contributor of sodium to your diet. Read food labels and choose low-sodium options when possible. Aim to consume less than 2,300 milligrams per day, and less than 1,500 milligrams if you’ve already been diagnosed with hypertension. 

Perhaps you’ve never given much thought to your blood pressure, especially if it’s been spot on for most of your life. But as you get older and deal with more stressful aspects of in life, it can affect your blood pressure. Maybe not quite high enough to require medication, but it may be something to keep an eye on it. And this can affect even those who eat well, exercise most days, and do all the right things to stay healthy.


Exercise can help you lose weight, but it does much more. Exercise strengthens your heart, improves circulation, and it can even reduce stress. Aim to fit in at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity cardio most days of the week, which can lower your blood pressure by 4-9 millimeters of mercury. Good choices include cycling, jogging, aerobic dance, swimming, and tennis. If exercise is new to you, talk to the staff at First Choice Medical for guidance about how to start.
If you have hypertension, ask your doctor if OSA could be behind it. (In addition to loud snoring, common symptoms include excessive daytime tiredness and early morning headaches.) Getting your sleep apnea under control could be helpful for improving your blood pressure, says Robert Greenfield, MD, Medical Director of Non-Invasive Cardiology & Cardiac Rehabilitation at MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, CA.
You should stop smoking and drinking as it causes high blood pressure. These habits seriously affect the process of absorption of nutrients in the digestive system. Low supply of nutrients results in several health problems. Excessive smoking and consumption of alcohol tends to damage the arteries. This causes circulation problems and increase in blood pressure. So, stay away from smoking and heavy drinking.
Blood pressure is written as two numbers, such as 112/78 mm Hg. The top, systolic, number is the pressure when the heart beats. The bottom, diastolic, number is the pressure when the heart rests between beats. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80 mm Hg. If you’re an adult and your systolic pressure is 120 to 139, or your diastolic pressure is 80 to 89 (or both), you have pre-hypertension. High blood pressure is a pressure of 140 systolic or higher and/or 90 diastolic or higher that stays high over time.
Eating healthy foods control blood pressure automatically. If you have high blood pressure, a healthy diet will help to lower your blood pressure naturally. Vegetables, fruits, and fibrous foods are example of healthy foods. Similarly, avoid eating oily foods loaded with cholesterol and calories. Avoid to intake more salt to your body. Eat lots of green vegetables, fruits and fiber rich diet to lower blood pressure fast.
Stress hormones constrict your blood vessels and can lead to temporary spikes in blood pressure. In addition, over time, stress can trigger unhealthy habits that put your cardiovascular health at risk. These might include overeating, poor sleep, and misusing drugs and alcohol. For all these reasons, reducing stress should be a priority if you're looking to lower your blood pressure.
Hypertension, or high blood pressure, refers to the pressure of blood against your artery walls. Over time, high blood pressure can cause blood vessel damage that leads to heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, and other problems. Hypertension is sometimes called the silent killer because it produces no symptoms and can go unnoticed — and untreated — for years.
Providing at least 5 servings of vegetables and 4 servings of fruits daily, which help ensure that you eat plenty of foods that are full of stomach-filling volume yet are low in calories, enhancing weight-loss efforts. Losing excess weight is one of the most effective ways to lower blood pressure in the short term. Eating plenty of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables also means you’ll be eating excellent sources of potassium, magnesium, and calcium. Many studies have found that foods rich in these minerals help blunt some of the toxic effects of sodium. 

It is must to keep your body well hydrated and it is highly recommended if you are suffering from high Blood pressure. Drink about 8-10 glasses of water each day. You can also drink warm coconut or coconut water, along with normal water for best results. Coconut water is delicious and develops nutritional values as well. They help in controlling and lowering the hypertension levels. It is an easy and simple method to improve blood pressure level by just consuming coconut water regularly. Try to use coconut oil than your regular oil for cooking.
How does apple cider vinegar lower blood pressure exactly? This isn’t entirely known, but medical studies have shown that people who consumed apple cider vinegar in their daily meals showed lower levels in their blood pressure without changing anything else in their diets, according to recent medical reports. You can have the same results in simply adding apple cider vinegar to your daily diet.
Although Hildegard was not a huge fan of olive oil, we certainly are. You should regularly consume moderate amounts of olive oil to reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The healthy fats in olive oil also naturally lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The well documented benefits of healthy fats is why olive oil makes our list of home remedies for high blood pressure. In folk medicine, the leaves of the olive tree are also used for supportive therapy.
10. Increase intake of potassium: Potassium is important to keep blood pressure under control as it helps the body to get rid of sodium. Including more fresh and whole foods in your diet can contribute to healthy levels of potassium in your body. Foods rich in potassium include bananas, beans, nuts and seeds, tuna, salmon, dairy products and green leafy veggies are rich sources of potassium.
Change to a healthier diet and lay off the salt. Planning ahead is key to eating healthy on the road. Pack a cooler with fruits, vegetables, and meals. Some drivers keep electric coolers or refrigerators in their truck with them, giving them plenty of snack options. A healthy diet on the road will also help your alertness and decision-making skills, making you a better driver.Stop eating greasy fast food every day and order a salad. Also, drink tons of water. Not only does hydration help keep blood pressure under control, but it will help eliminate bodily waste.

Chocolate lovers can rejoice because consuming dark chocolate daily may lower high blood pressure. The flavanols in dark chocolate appear to activate nitric acid, which is a gas that allows the blood vessels to relax and widen, reports the Science Daily website. In a study published in the March 2010 issue of the "European Heart Journal," Dr. Brian Buijsse and colleagues from the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Germany found that participants who ate approximately 7.5g of dark chocolate a day had lower blood pressure and had a 39 percent less likely chance of having a heart attack or stroke.
Blood pressure medications should only be taken according to your doctor’s instructions. Never take another person’s blood pressure medication and never take an extra or early dose of your own medications unless advised to do so by your doctor. All blood pressure medications can cause dangerously low blood pressure when taken by the wrong person or when taken in excess or too early.
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