TM was developed in India in the 1950s by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It has had its fair share of celebrities, from the Beatles to Madonna, swear by it. The technique involves using mantra (sounds or chants) to focus meditate while one sits for about 15 minutes with the eyes closed. It gained some notoriety/free publicity in 1977 when a US Court ruled against a TM program being taught in New Jersey schools as being "overtly religious in nature". The program ended up getting scrapped, but the case also helped TM get even more attention in the US. This was followed paradoxically by a comeback by TM when in a sort of "quasi-recognition" by the establishment, the Maharishi University in Fairfield, Iowa, received $20 million in NIH (National Institute of Health) funding to study the effects of TM on human health!
Ginger, the spicy root often used in Asian cooking, could also help lower blood pressure. According to M. Jan Ghayur and A. Gilani from The Aga Khan University Medical College in Pakistan and published in the January 2005 issue of the "Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology," ginger can reduce blood pressure by blocking the voltage-dependent calcium channels. MedlinePlus agrees that ginger does reduce high blood pressure, but individuals who take medication for their high blood pressure should use ginger with precaution because ginger might lower it too much or cause an irregular heartbeat.
A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at how eating whole grains affected blood pressure in middle-aged people. British researchers compared a diet of whole wheat (or whole wheat plus oats) to a diet of refined grains. They found that eating three servings of whole grains was linked with a reduction in systolic blood pressure. Exactly why isn't clear, athough other research has pointed to beneficial effects of whole grains on cholesterol.
4. Find an exercise that works for you (and do it). Moving more can help reverse high blood pressure. One meta-analysis of 65 studies found regular exercise provides both an acute and longer-term reduction in blood pressure. Whether you’re an exercise novice or a conditioned athlete, these four strategies can help you create an effective workout plan to optimize health.
There are many good options when it comes to such medication. Examples are ACE (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) inhibitors or AII-blockers (angiotensin II receptor blockers) such as Enalapril or Losartan. If this kind of medication doesn’t give the desired effect, you might have to add other medication such as so-called calcium antagonists (e.g. Felodipin) or a mild diuretic (can be found as a combined pill with Enalapril and Losartan).
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