It is must to keep your body well hydrated and it is highly recommended if you are suffering from high Blood pressure. Drink about 8-10 glasses of water each day. You can also drink warm coconut or coconut water, along with normal water for best results. Coconut water is delicious and develops nutritional values as well. They help in controlling and lowering the hypertension levels. It is an easy and simple method to improve blood pressure level by just consuming coconut water regularly. Try to use coconut oil than your regular oil for cooking.


Take multiple readings and record the results. Each time you measure, take two or three readings one minute apart and record the results using a printable (PDF) or online tracker. If your monitor has built-in memory to store your readings, take it with you to your appointments. Some monitors may also allow you to upload your readings to a secure website after you register your profile.
A rising heart rate does not cause your blood pressure to increase at the same rate. Even though your heart is beating more times a minute, healthy blood vessels dilate (get larger) to allow more blood to flow through more easily. When you exercise, your heart speeds up so more blood can reach your muscles. It may be possible for your heart rate to double safely, while your blood pressure may respond by only increasing a modest amount.
No-one seems to have written for a while, but I wanted to say how friendly everyone seems. I will join you in trying the honey in lemon and see if it works. I have read that beet juice helps lower BP. Has anyone here tried it? The prescription BP meds have ruined my shoulder and thigh muscles and I want to come them once the natural remedies kick in. Thank you to everyone for your helpful advice.
Americans eat far too much dietary sodium, up to three times the recommended total amount, which is 1,500 milligrams (mg) daily for individuals with high blood pressure, says Dr. Fisher. It doesn't take much sodium to reach that 1,500-mg daily cap — just 3/4 of a teaspoon of salt. There's half of that amount of sodium in one Egg McMuffin breakfast sandwich. Weed out high-sodium foods by reading labels carefully. "It is very difficult to lower dietary sodium without reading labels, unless you prepare all of your own food," says Dr. Fisher. Beware in particular of what the American Heart Association has dubbed the "salty six," common foods where high amounts of sodium may be lurking:
Explore the articles below to learn more about blood pressure control and healthy living, and to start developing your own personal guide to lowering blood pressure. Even better, book a health vacation at Pritikin, recently described by The New York Times as the “granddaddy of health-based wellness spas.” Make a personal investment in what matters most – a longer life, a better life.

Chronic hypertension causes the arteries throughout a patient’s body to become damaged and can lead to additional complications that may yield fatal consequences, especially when left untreated. One study noted that there is a significant increase in the risk for coronary artery disease and stroke amongst people who have elevated or high blood pressure. The study also noted that developing this condition at a younger age seems to hold an opportunity for more risks.


Exercise every day. Moderate exercise can lower your risk of high blood pressure. Set some goals so you can exercise safely and work your way up to exercising at least 30 minutes a day most days of the week. Check with your doctor before starting an exercise plan if you have any health problems that are not being treated. You can find more information about exercise and physical activity at Go4Life.
4. Reduce intake of caffeine: In case you constantly need stimulants like tea or coffee to get you through the day, you definitely need to check your health. Moreover, caffeine can cause short-term spike on your blood pressure. Read here to know how many cups of tea or coffee you should have in a day in order to keep your blood pressure under control.

If these lifestyle changes don't lower your blood pressure to a safe level, your doctor will also prescribe medicine. You may try several kinds or combinations of medicines before finding a plan that works best for you. Medicine can control your blood pressure, but it can't cure it. You will likely need to take medicine for the rest of your life. Plan with your doctor how to manage your blood pressure.
There are a large number of prescription medications that are commonly used to help lower and maintain blood pressure within a healthy range.  These include diuretics, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, and many more.  And, while the right medication can be a great tool in fighting high blood pressure, there are many other ways in which some patients may be able to control their condition naturally.

Modern times have brought us many great technological advances that help ease our life. But, it has also brought us face to face with some diseases and health problems related to our stressful lifestyle. Of these many health conditions is high blood pressure. It is known as the silent killer that can lead to heart attacks that prove fatal. It has been found that one in every four adults suffer from high blood pressure. And most of these people are not even aware that they suffer from this silent disease. This is because most of the time, high blood pressure doesn't exhibit any symptoms.


When your heart beats, it squeezes blood into the arteries and creates pressure. The systolic pressure or top number, represents the heart’s force of moving the blood into those arteries. Between beats, the heart is at rest while it refills with blood. The diastolic pressure, or bottom number, measures the pressure in the arteries while the heart is resting.
Our bodies react to tension by releasing stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline into the blood. These hormones can raise your heart rate and constrict blood vessels, causing your blood pressure to spike. But slow breathing and meditative practices such as qigong, yoga, and tai chi can help keep stress hormones—and your blood pressure—in check, Williams says. (And if you haven't heard, health benefits of meditation include reduced inflammation, natural pain relief, and more.) Start with five minutes in the morning and five minutes at night and build up from there. The breathing exercise above is designed to help you fall asleep fast.

And remember: If you do a water fast, it’s critical to drink high-quality water. (Many Food Revolution members like the AquaTru water filter because it delivers high-quality water for a remarkably affordable price. Find out more and get a special discount here. If you order from this link, the AquaTru manufacturer will contribute a portion of the proceeds to support Food Revolution Network’s mission of healthy, ethical, sustainable food for everyone who eats.)


6. Cultivate stress management. You don’t need a meta-analysis of cohort studies to prove stress can raise blood pressure, but they exist. You can’t eliminate stress, but you can minimize its impact. Research shows yoga and meditation create effective strategies to manage stress and blood pressure. If those aren’t your thing, consider other stress-relieving tactics including deep breathing or practicing mindfulness.
Dr. Palanismy notes that a particular form of stress reduction called Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction has been proven in research studies to reduce blood pressure. This approach to stress reduction uses meditation, body awareness and movement such as yoga to help people better observe their experiences, instead of being completely immersed in them. This helps them take a step back in stressful situations.
The calculated difference between the systolic and diastolic pressures is also of interest. If the difference is large (e.g. 170/85), it could be the sign of stiff arteries – often caused by heart disease. This means the blood vessels can’t dilate enough when the heart sends out a pulse, which forces the blood pressure to increase. (The walls can’t expand, so the pressure rises when the heart tries to pump the blood through.) 

There are many good options when it comes to such medication. Examples are ACE (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) inhibitors or AII-blockers (angiotensin II receptor blockers) such as Enalapril or Losartan. If this kind of medication doesn’t give the desired effect, you might have to add other medication such as so-called calcium antagonists (e.g. Felodipin) or a mild diuretic (can be found as a combined pill with Enalapril and Losartan).
Salt is everywhere, and high blood pressure (the result of too much salt in our diets) is an American epidemic. New CDC guidelines (and decades-old Pritikin guidelines) advise that most of us should eat no more than 1,500 mg of sodium a day. We average 3,500 to 5,000 mg daily. Why are we so blasé about the massive doses of salt we’re consuming? How can we change?.
A study published in the journal Hypertension looked at pistachio consumption and blood pressure. Participants, who had high LDL cholesterol, ate one or two servings of pistachio nuts daily for four weeks. In the end, the lower dose of nuts was better at reducing systolic blood pressure than the higher dose. An increase in the volume of blood pumped from the heart could account for the difference, but it's not entirely clear. Or, pistachio nuts may reduce constriction of peripheral blood vessels.
“We have many people with hypertension who come to Pritikin,” says Pritikin’s Associate Medical Director Danine Fruge, MD, “and within three days, many have blood pressures that have dropped so low that we need to reduce their medications or take them off their pills altogether. Yes, just three days. That’s how quickly and powerfully our bodies respond to healthy food, exercise, and other lifestyle changes.”
As blood pressure tends to vary somewhat from day to day, it’s recommended to only diagnose someone with high blood pressure if they have given a repeatedly high reading. If the average of either of the readings (either the systolic or diastolic) is higher than the norm, it will be considered an elevated blood pressure. That is, an average of 150/85 or 135/100 over readings on several occassions will be considered too high.
This is an interesting thread. I take 400 mg per day of Magnesium on the advice of my naturopath, have done so for a few years now, with some cycling on and off. I successfully manage my tendency towards hypertension through this one simple action (although constantly improving my health in other ways has its’ effects I’m sure!). I find when I cycle off it for too long I start to get muscle cramps and insomnia as well. I have observed a familial link between muscle pain and cramps in my maternal lineage, and believe there is some kind of genetic/epigenetic link to how our family utilises Mg in the body although I have no proof or idea of the mechanism of this. All I know is I’d prefer to supplement Mg moderately than take pharmaceuticals. I look forward to the day I can explain this with science (as I’m a scientist!) – would love any thoughts from Chris or the Kresser Institute experts on this 😊
Those who received a placebo drink improved their reading by only 1 point. The phytochemicals in hibiscus are probably responsible for the large reduction in high blood pressure, say the study authors. Many herbal teas contain hibiscus; look for blends that list it near the top of the chart of ingredients for low blood pressure—this often indicates a higher concentration per serving.
For most part I stay away from supplementing anything other than protein powder .There was a time when I figured the more supplements the better and my stomach soon said otherwise .The biggest key in my health and we’ll being has been staying active as much as possible .my job requires me to be constantly moving throughout day so I’ve got lots of energy afterwork compared to a sedentary job .My whole world changed once I incorporated proper balance in my life with my family , work and play time 🙂
Researchers from the United Kingdom looked at the effect of pomegranate juice on blood pressure among young and middle-aged people. Consuming more than a cup of pomegranate juice every day for four weeks was linked to a drop in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, according to the study results, published in Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. It's not clear what might be causing these reductions, but it may be the potassium or polyphenols found in pomegranate juice.
Even if you don’t keep a salt shaker on the table, you may have too much sodium in your diet. Processed foods -- especially canned soups, salad dressings, snack mixes, and fast food -- are a large contributor of sodium to your diet. Read food labels and choose low-sodium options when possible. Aim to consume less than 2,300 milligrams per day, and less than 1,500 milligrams if you’ve already been diagnosed with hypertension.

Note: The fasting and high blood pressure study described in this article was funded in part by a grant from the National Health Association. It was conducted at the Center for Conservative Therapy in Penngrove, California. The results appeared in the article, “Medically Supervised Water-Only Fasting in the Treatment of Hypertension,” published in June 2001 in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics.
You bet. As reported by ABC World News on September 16, 20103, one cardiologist believes the connection between stress and hypertension is undeniable, yet still does not receive the emphasis it deserves. In response, Dr. Kennedy developed a stress-relieving technique he calls "The 15 Minute Heart Cure," a set of breathing and creative visualization techniques that can be done anywhere, anytime. The technique is demonstrated in the ABC World News video above. By teaching your body to slow down and relax when stress hits -- essentially short-circuiting your physical stress reaction -- you can protect your health.
Cayenne pepper is also good for treating hypertension and including reducing blood pressure. It makes the blood flow. You can add cayenne pepper to your vegetable, salad or fruit salad. You can also add a small pinch of cayenne pepper powder into your smoothies and soups. Use only a small amount of cayenne pepper as it is very spicy. Try this method to lower blood pressure at home.

2. Take an omega-3 oil. Omega 6:3 ratio is important. A lot of us get way too much omega-6 in our diets, which is what's caused the omega-3 craze. Refined vegetable oil is one of the main culprits, and found in almost all processed foods, and even some orange juices. Because we have way too much omega-6 in our systems, we need to compensate by taking some form of omega-3 oil. Decreasing your intake of processed foods will have a similar effect.


Very curious to see if Chris has any thoughts on this; I have had similar experiences with over 400 mg of magnesium in any form.. I’ve tried various chelates versions. I’m also wary of mega-dosing with supplements. My father has tried all kinds of mega-doses of all these things over the last decade to get off meds and still ends up with scarily high bp after a month or so off meds. Everything in moderation and I think sometimes that has to include conventional medication. Side effects at this late stage in his life can’t be as bad as a potentially debilitating stroke 🙁
Cut down on salt. As you get older, the body and blood pressure become more sensitive to salt (sodium), so you may need to watch how much salt is in your diet. Most of the salt comes from processed foods (for example, soup and baked goods). A low-salt diet, such as the DASH diet, might help lower your blood pressure. Talk with your doctor about eating less salt.
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