Common painkillers (so-called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAID), can increase your blood pressure by inhibiting the production of salt in your kidneys. This includes over-the-counter pills such as Ipren, Ibumetin, Ibuprofen, Diklofenak and Naproxen as well as the prescription drug Celebra. Painkillers with the active substance paracetamol are better for your blood pressure.
Get more and better sleep. As difficult as it is for a truck driver to get regular, deep sleep, studies have shown that continuous poor-quality sleep plays at least some part in raising blood pressure. A better diet and exercise can help facilitate good sleep. Try blocking out light and sound if possible. Plan ahead to try and sleep away from a lot of activity. Also, invest in a higher-end mattress; it’s well worth the extra cash.

Most doctors have been taught that once a diagnosis of “high blood pressure” has been made, blood pressure medication is the treatment of choice. As a result, many physicians believe that the current definition of “high” blood pressure is also the same level of blood pressure at which drug treatments are worthwhile. Unfortunately, this is not the case.
High blood pressure is not usually something that you can feel or notice, and it can go undiagnosed because there are usually no symptoms. Regardless, high blood pressure can lead to kidney damage, stroke or a heart attack. Therefore, it's important you get your blood pressure checked regularly. Check with your GP or nurse how often to get it checked.
Exercise. Some patients will cringe at the suggestion of exercise, because they envision a chronic cardio scenario like a mouse on a running wheel. Spread the good news: exercise of all kinds—endurance, dynamic resistance, HIIT, isometric resistance—has the potential to reduce blood pressure (38). Whatever exercise your patients will actually do on a regular basis is the best recipe for success. In patients with extreme hypertension, be cautious with exercises that may further increase blood pressure to an unsafe zone (39).
Dairy or soy—it’s your choice. Replacing some of the refined carbohydrates in your diet with foods high in soy or milk protein (like tofu or low-fat dairy) can bring down systolic blood pressure if you have hypertension or prehypertension, findings suggest. "Some patients get inflammation from refined carbohydrates, which will increase blood pressure," says Matthew J. Budoff, MD, FACC, Professor of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine and Director of Cardiac CT at the Division of Cardiology at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center.
Meditate or take slow, steady deep breaths to calm the nervous system, relax and your dilate blood vessels. Breathing exercises help calm your sympathetic nervous system and your fight-or-flight response. This technique also encourages blood flow to your body’s tissues and causes your diaphragm to move up and down, which eases blood flow to your heart.
I totally agree with you that we should not rely on medication for high blood pressure. End of the day, high blood pressure is a symptom that our body requires immediate attention. The kidneys work extremely hard to send out the “signal” to us and what we did is to pop a high blood pressure pill to suppress the signal. With this medication, our body has to work even harder to send us another signal. No wonder over the long run people who are suffering from high blood pressure needs an additional pill for deteriorating kidneys. Our body is fully capable of healing itself without us realizing it. I strongly encourage high blood pressure sufferers to listen to this and say goodbye to high blood pressure once and for all:
4. Reduce intake of caffeine: In case you constantly need stimulants like tea or coffee to get you through the day, you definitely need to check your health. Moreover, caffeine can cause short-term spike on your blood pressure. Read here to know how many cups of tea or coffee you should have in a day in order to keep your blood pressure under control.

High blood pressure is a common health issue with so many people. It is also called as hypertension, a persistent medical condition that takes place, when there is a high pressure of the blood in the arteries. Usually, the blood pressure is measured by the diastolic and systolic movements. High blood pressure is considered, if the reading is at or above 140/90 mmHg.
Bananas are one great source of potassium, but there are other tasty ways to get your fill. Potatoes actually pack more potassium than the yellow fruit (and you might be surprised to learn there are plenty of other health benefits of potatoes, too). Sweet potatoes, tomatoes, orange juice, kidney beans, peas, cantaloupe, honeydew, and dried fruits like prunes or raisins are other good sources. In all, you should aim to get 2,000 to 4,000 mg of potassium a day, Van Horn recommends.
Explore the articles below to learn more about blood pressure control and healthy living, and to start developing your own personal guide to lowering blood pressure. Even better, book a health vacation at Pritikin, recently described by The New York Times as the “granddaddy of health-based wellness spas.” Make a personal investment in what matters most – a longer life, a better life.

A 2013 review on yoga and blood pressure found an average blood pressure decrease of 3.62 mm Hg diastolic and 4.17 mm Hg systolic when compared to those who didn’t exercise. Studies of yoga practices that included breath control, postures, and meditation were nearly twice as effective as yoga practices that didn’t include all three of these elements (24).


Very curious to see if Chris has any thoughts on this; I have had similar experiences with over 400 mg of magnesium in any form.. I’ve tried various chelates versions. I’m also wary of mega-dosing with supplements. My father has tried all kinds of mega-doses of all these things over the last decade to get off meds and still ends up with scarily high bp after a month or so off meds. Everything in moderation and I think sometimes that has to include conventional medication. Side effects at this late stage in his life can’t be as bad as a potentially debilitating stroke 🙁
Providing at least 5 servings of vegetables and 4 servings of fruits daily, which help ensure that you eat plenty of foods that are full of stomach-filling volume yet are low in calories, enhancing weight-loss efforts. Losing excess weight is one of the most effective ways to lower blood pressure in the short term. Eating plenty of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables also means you’ll be eating excellent sources of potassium, magnesium, and calcium. Many studies have found that foods rich in these minerals help blunt some of the toxic effects of sodium.
Aerobic activity can be an effective way to control high blood pressure. But flexibility and strengthening exercises such as lifting weights are also important parts of an overall fitness plan. You don’t need to spend hours in the gym every day to benefit from aerobic activity. By adding moderate physical activities to your daily routine will also help.

Chronic hypertension causes the arteries throughout a patient’s body to become damaged and can lead to additional complications that may yield fatal consequences, especially when left untreated. One study noted that there is a significant increase in the risk for coronary artery disease and stroke amongst people who have elevated or high blood pressure. The study also noted that developing this condition at a younger age seems to hold an opportunity for more risks.


Exercise. Some patients will cringe at the suggestion of exercise, because they envision a chronic cardio scenario like a mouse on a running wheel. Spread the good news: exercise of all kinds—endurance, dynamic resistance, HIIT, isometric resistance—has the potential to reduce blood pressure (38). Whatever exercise your patients will actually do on a regular basis is the best recipe for success. In patients with extreme hypertension, be cautious with exercises that may further increase blood pressure to an unsafe zone (39).


Get moving at least a little bit every day, with a standard recommendation of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week. Get your heart pumping at a moderate intensity for a few times a week, and mix it up with some strength training. Because life happens, on the days when you can’t fit it in, try to build more activity into your day by parking further away, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or even just doing a quick sprint or two up and down the block. Every little bit helps.
A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at how eating whole grains affected blood pressure in middle-aged people. British researchers compared a diet of whole wheat (or whole wheat plus oats) to a diet of refined grains. They found that eating three servings of whole grains was linked with a reduction in systolic blood pressure. Exactly why isn't clear, athough other research has pointed to beneficial effects of whole grains on cholesterol.
High blood pressure is a common health issue with so many people. It is also called as hypertension, a persistent medical condition that takes place, when there is a high pressure of the blood in the arteries. Usually, the blood pressure is measured by the diastolic and systolic movements. High blood pressure is considered, if the reading is at or above 140/90 mmHg.
The normal blood pressure is supposed to be around 120/80 mm Hg (or a little lower). However, when the blood pressure is 130/90 mm Hg or 140/90 mm Hg, the person is said to have hypertension or high blood pressure. In stage I hypertension, the systolic pressure is between 140-159 mm Hg, while the diastolic pressure is between 90-99 mm Hg. In stage II hypertension, the systolic blood pressure is 160 mm Hg or higher, and the diastolic reading is 100 mm Hg or higher. Figures like 200/110 mm Hg indicate severe hypertension.
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Ginger, the spicy root often used in Asian cooking, could also help lower blood pressure. According to M. Jan Ghayur and A. Gilani from The Aga Khan University Medical College in Pakistan and published in the January 2005 issue of the "Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology," ginger can reduce blood pressure by blocking the voltage-dependent calcium channels. MedlinePlus agrees that ginger does reduce high blood pressure, but individuals who take medication for their high blood pressure should use ginger with precaution because ginger might lower it too much or cause an irregular heartbeat.
None of the home remedies for high blood pressure will be as effective as eliminating your choices that affect your blood pressure. For example, smoking or chewing tobacco immediately raises your blood pressure. While the increase is often temporary, it can still permanently damage the lining of your artery walls. The damage can result in more narrow arteries, which increases blood pressure.

None of the home remedies for high blood pressure will be as effective as eliminating your choices that affect your blood pressure. For example, smoking or chewing tobacco immediately raises your blood pressure. While the increase is often temporary, it can still permanently damage the lining of your artery walls. The damage can result in more narrow arteries, which increases blood pressure.
So what is the best exercise to lower blood pressure? The answer is, any exercise that you can do will help you reduce your blood pressure. Whether it is walking, or rowing, the idea is to keep moving and get your heart pumping. Exercise helps un-stiffen those blood vessels and helps them to dilate and relax. When your blood vessels are supple and relaxed your blood pressure comes down. Exercise is not only great for the body, but research has proven that exercise also improves our mental outlook.
Although certain supplements may be helpful, it's important to understand they should never be used as a substitute for basic lifestyle choices that treat the real cause of the problem. Using only supplements without modifying your lifestyle is an allopathic approach not very different from using drugs. In most instances, it is not likely to be effective. Once you have made some beneficial changes to your lifestyle, you can then consider some of the following supplements as a way to further enhance your health:
Cold-water fish. Increasing serum measurements of DHA/EPA, markers of fish intake, are related to lower blood pressure (12, 13, 14). However, steer clear of most fish oil supplements and instead have patients obtain beneficial nutrients from whole foods whenever possible. A recent analysis showed that the three top-selling fish oils in the United States contained oxidized lipids that may be causing more harm than good (15). Beyond DHA and EPA, fish also have selenium, zinc, iron, and a highly absorbable protein that also may reduce blood pressure (16). Aim for cold-water fatty fish three times a week.
As you get older, high blood pressure, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is more common and can increase your risk of serious health problems. Treatment, especially if you have other medical conditions, requires ongoing evaluation and discussions with your doctor to strike the best balance of reducing risks and maintaining a good quality of life.
It's especially important to place the blood pressure cuff in the correct location and keep your arm in the recommended position. If your initial blood pressure reading is high, re-read the instructions, make any necessary adjustments, and then take your blood pressure again. Make sure enough time has past in between readings that you're not repeatedly squeezing the same arm in a short amount of time.
Exercises like walking can be incorporated into almost any lifestyle, even the most pressed for time. Studies have shown that even short bursts of exercise, 15 to 20 minutes of time, will lower blood pressure, and perhaps quickly lower blood pressure. Over the course of a day, anyone can easily incorporate such small increments to build a routine totaling a half hour or more. A busy schedule need not be an excuse to avoid exercise.
The bottom line, she tells WebMD, is that you have a choice when it comes to exercise. "Some people like to work out all at once, but others say they can't comply with an exercise program because they have no time. These findings suggest people with time crunches and busy schedules can fit bits of exercise in throughout the day and reap the same health benefits."
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