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Hypertension can be effectively treated with lifestyle modifications, medications, and natural remedies. Most people with hypertension experience improvement with prescription treatment such as diuretics, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, or other options, and some may require more than one prescription medication to reach optimal blood pressure. If your hypertension has a medical cause (secondary hypertension), you may also need treatment for medical issues that are contributing to your high blood pressure.
For people who aren't able to bring their levels down naturally, blood pressure medication may be necessary. Of the 14% of Americans now considered to have high blood pressure, around one in five will need to be treated with meds, according to the AHA. But if your high blood pressure is a result of unhealthy habits, making some simple changes may help reduce—or even eliminate—your need for prescription drugs. With your doctor’s okay, give these home remedies for high blood pressure a try and see if they work for you.
The American Heart Association considers 120/80 to be a normal blood pressure reading. Unless you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure you may not realize anything is wrong so it is important to get tested each time you see your doctor, or more frequently if you have a family history of hypertension. Often, hypertension has no obvious symptoms, but it could be quietly causing damage and threatening your health. This condition overworks the heart and damages the walls of the blood vessels. If left untreated, it can lead to tears, ruptures, or increased plaque build-up in your heart, which increases your risk for heart failure, heart attack or stroke.
A study, done in December of 2009, was published in the Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics. They gave a group of participants 1 teaspoon of cardamom powder daily for several weeks. The results showed a significant reduction in blood pressure. Combined with ginger and cinnamon, both warming spices that improve circulation, you can make a lovely tea to help your heart get healthy.
Stress contributes to a notable increase in your blood pressure. Stress is a part of life though, so you can learn how to manage it better. Ways to cope with stress include avoiding stressful situations, such as people who trigger anger or high-traffic routes when you’re driving. Avoid overscheduling yourself, and learn to say no to commitments that are voluntary.
Reduce processed sugar and refined carbohydrates. Many studies have shown a link between high blood pressure and processed sugar. Even moderate amounts of sugar can raise blood pressure. For example, during the Framingham Women’s Health Study, women who drank as little as one soda per day had higher blood pressure than women who drank less. It’s not just sweet sugar that raises blood pressure. Refined carbohydrates, like white bread and pasta, covert to sugar quickly when they’re eaten, and they may also cause blood pressure to rise. There is evidence that reducing refined sugar intake can lower blood pressure and improve heart health.
Magnesium. High magnesium intake is associated with lower blood pressure and may have a synergistic effect with potassium. Increasing both nutrients while moderately reducing sodium can lower blood pressure to the same extent as a single medication (17). Magnesium stimulates vasodilators and can inhibit free radical formation in blood vessels (18). Nuts, seeds, spinach, beet greens, and chocolate are good whole food sources.
Blood pressure medications should only be taken according to your doctor’s instructions. Never take another person’s blood pressure medication and never take an extra or early dose of your own medications unless advised to do so by your doctor. All blood pressure medications can cause dangerously low blood pressure when taken by the wrong person or when taken in excess or too early.
1. Isometric handgrip exercises. An American Heart Association study found that squeezing a spring-loaded handgrip for two minutes, over a period of 12 to 15 minutes three times a week, can help lower blood pressure. Why? The study found that blood flow returns to your hands after the isometric exercise, improving blood vessel function. Another study reported in the journal Hypertension found this exercise produced a 10% drop in both systolic (top number) and diastolic (bottom number) readings when practiced six times a day, five days a week for four weeks.

We've got a bit of a different podcast today for you Guys & Gals, but it's still a goodie, and jam packed with exciting information. The Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences, Dr. Dean Radin, joins us to discuss his expertise on real magic and how can it optimize performance for everyone. Dr. Radin is the author of many books, but his newest, titled Real Magic, delves into the worlds of telepathy and psychokinesis; which he explains may not solely be powers of the imagination. Enjoy!
A study, done in December of 2009, was published in the Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics. They gave a group of participants 1 teaspoon of cardamom powder daily for several weeks. The results showed a significant reduction in blood pressure. Combined with ginger and cinnamon, both warming spices that improve circulation, you can make a lovely tea to help your heart get healthy.

Sipping on not one but four cups of tea daily can help control blood pressure. A study presented at the European Society of Hyper tension in Milan found those who avoided coffee and tea consumption all together had the highest rates of blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Those who drank tea the most often, between one to four cups a day, had the lowest systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings, as well as the lowest pulse pressure and heart rate. Pinkies up, for your blood pressure’s sake.
2. Ayurveda Die: Improper diet also contributes towards the unhealthy condition of the body. Eat a balanced diet and avoid the consumption of salt and sugar, pickles, alcohol, caffeine, tomatoes, and fatty foods to regulate high BP. Include ginger, green leafy veggies, yogurt, berries, oatmeal, onion, amla, Omega-3 fatty acid, beetroot, Vitamin C rich fruits, herbs, garlic, seeds, cucumber, bananas, pomegranate, nuts, avocados and olive oil, in your meals.
Celery seed is an herb used to flavor soups, stews, casseroles, and other savory dishes. Celery has long been used to treat hypertension in China, and studies in rodents have shown that it may be effective. You can use the seeds, or you can juice the whole plant. Celery may also be a diuretic, which may help explain its effect on blood pressure. Researchers believe that a variety of substances in celery may play a role in lowering blood pressure. However, human studies are needed.
Omega-3 fats are typically found in flaxseed oil, walnut oil and fish, with fish being by far the best source. Unfortunately, most fresh fish today contains dangerously high levels of mercury. Your best bet is to find a safe source of fish, or if this proves too difficult, supplement with a high quality krill oil, which has been found to be 48 times more potent than fish oil.
Note: The fasting and high blood pressure study described in this article was funded in part by a grant from the National Health Association. It was conducted at the Center for Conservative Therapy in Penngrove, California. The results appeared in the article, “Medically Supervised Water-Only Fasting in the Treatment of Hypertension,” published in June 2001 in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics.
Today's episode of the OPP we feature guest Joe Scola, who is the founder of Wise Ape Tea. They specialize in Adaptogenic teas, which regulate stress for your body. We get into some HEAVY Tea Topics like the weirdest blend of tea, the historic origins of tea, and discuss how adding in CBDs affects tea. Wise Ape also partners with many organizations, and for each tea sale they donate a chunk of the proceeds to these organizations which is awesome! Each tea is partnered with a specific charitable organization so go out there, buy your favorite tea, and contribute to a great cause! Two birds with one stone!
Cayenne Pepper is probably the fastest way to lower high blood pressure. Cayenne pepper is a powerful vasodilator, which means it helps expand blood vessels and improve blood flow. This effect naturally lowers blood pressure levels by increasing the rate at which blood flows throughout the circulatory system, which in turn takes some of the pressure off arterial walls. Either mix one teaspoon of cayenne pepper with half a cup of lukewarm water or mix two tablespoons of raw organic honey with two teaspoons of cayenne pepper; boil them with eight ounces of water and drink when it is warm. A side note: Be careful how many Scoville Units your cayenne pepper is. I bought mine, 90,000 Scoville Units, and OMG. I thought I was going to breathe fire.
Flavanols an anti-inflammatory and heart-protective antioxidant found in raw cacao may protect against cardiovascular disease, reduce the risk of stroke, and help improve blood circulation. Thus lowering your blood pressure. Cacao contains over 700 compounds and the complex antioxidants found in it known as polyphenols help reduce ‘bad cholesterol’ and prevent hardening of the arteries.
Fish are a great source of lean protein. Fatty fish like mackerel and salmon are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and lower triglycerides. In addition to these fish sources, trout contains vitamin D. Foods rarely contain vitamin D, and this hormone-like vitamin has properties that can lower blood pressure.
3. Quit smoking and alcohol: Because, neither of the two is of any benefit to your health. What's more is that smoking is listed as a causative factor for almost all diseases. You name a disease, and smoking will be a contributing factor to it. Alcohol, on the other hand, has direct links with increasing blood pressure. No amount of alcohol intake is safe or healthy for men or women.

Today's episode of the OPP we feature guest Joe Scola, who is the founder of Wise Ape Tea. They specialize in Adaptogenic teas, which regulate stress for your body. We get into some HEAVY Tea Topics like the weirdest blend of tea, the historic origins of tea, and discuss how adding in CBDs affects tea. Wise Ape also partners with many organizations, and for each tea sale they donate a chunk of the proceeds to these organizations which is awesome! Each tea is partnered with a specific charitable organization so go out there, buy your favorite tea, and contribute to a great cause! Two birds with one stone!


I do all of that. I as on bp meds for 10 years, got sick in 2008, went off all pharma meds, got lots of help from alternative medicine, was off all pharma meds for 9 years and completely and totally changed my diet and lifestyle, then in Oct 2016 my bp started to climb again and, after I had hernia surgery in Nov 2016, my bp went sky-high and won’t come back down no matter what alternative thing I do and won’t stay down unless I am taking bp pills. My primary doctor and cardiologist are trying to say I have essential hypertension–when I was off all bp and pharma meds for 9 years and had no issues with my bp. Nope. Not buying it. Baffled to the high heavens why this time, I can’t seem to get back off bp meds. Working on lots of different things, but haven’t found that magic “aha” item that is causing this yet. Started NP Thyroid and low-dose Naltrexone for hypo/Hashi and all-over body pain/autoimmune and am hoping once they help stabilize my body processes that maybe they will also impact the hbp. Also naturally taking care of female hormones that are off (postmenopausal at age 50).
Going hand-in-hand with the first two methods, body weight is a major factor associated with blood pressure.  In general, weight loss in those who are considered overweight or obese makes a significant, positive impact, and even a few pounds lost can help.  Likewise, waist size has also been linked with blood pressure.  Ideally, a man’s waist circumference should be less than 40 inches, and a woman’s should be less than 35 in order to minimize risk. 

It’s a common question among our guests at the Pritikin Longevity Center, who are taught how devastating the high-salt U.S. diet is to our blood pressure and overall health. Searching for alternatives, people often ask: What about salt substitutes with potassium? And what about MSG? Isn’t it a bad choice? Here are answers, some of which may surprise you.


I totally agree with you that we should not rely on medication for high blood pressure. End of the day, high blood pressure is a symptom that our body requires immediate attention. The kidneys work extremely hard to send out the “signal” to us and what we did is to pop a high blood pressure pill to suppress the signal. With this medication, our body has to work even harder to send us another signal. No wonder over the long run people who are suffering from high blood pressure needs an additional pill for deteriorating kidneys. Our body is fully capable of healing itself without us realizing it. I strongly encourage high blood pressure sufferers to listen to this and say goodbye to high blood pressure once and for all:
In today’s time, when stress walks along, practicing poor eating habits combined with a sedentary lifestyle only add to the wellness issues. We prioritize our work, responsibilities and daily chores, and these things gradually tyrannize our life. Amidst pressure and hectic schedule, our health is something that suffers a lot. Stress and tension pave way for many ailments and to start with, high BP is the most common by far.

Ocean Robbins is the author of 31-Day Food Revolution: Heal Your Body, Feel Great, and Transform Your World (Grand Central Life & Style, February 5, 2019). He is the CEO and co-founder of the 500,000+ member Food Revolution Network. He's served as the adjunct professor for Chapman University. And he's received numerous awards, including the national Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service and the Freedom's Flame Award. Ocean Robbins     

The stronger the heart, the more efficiently it can perform.  Those who are physically active and exercise regularly are far more likely to maintain healthy blood pressure than those who do not.  According to the American Heart Association, 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity three to four times per week is all it takes on average to help reduce high blood pressure.


Various organizations including the United States Department of Agriculture recommend that Americans consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium per day. But the ideal limit is really no more than 1,500 mg per day for most adults. Unfortunately, the average sodium intake of Americans is more than 3,400 mg per day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is partly because sodium is so easy to consume — just 1 teaspoon of salt contains 2,300 mg of sodium.

Beta blockers decrease the effect of adrenaline on the cardiovascular system, slow the heart rate, and reduce stress on the heart and the arteries. Side effects include worsening shortness of breath if you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma; sexual dysfunction; fatigue; depression; and worsening of symptoms if you have peripheral artery disease. Beta-blocker examples include:

Stress, along with the methods some use to compensate for it, such as overeating, smoking, or drinking, can exacerbate problems with blood pressure.  To help reduce stress, identify the contributing factors.  Where possible, minimize these stressors, or when that cannot be done, determine the most effective methods to cope with them such as meditation or dedicating more time to hobbies.

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Kidneys depend on healthy blood vessels to function properly, proper kidney function is crucial to filtering excess fluid and waste from your blood. High blood pressure can damage your kidneys leading to kidney disease (nephropathy). High blood pressure is the most common cause of kidney failure. Kidney failure leads to either dialysis or a kidney transplant, because your own body can no longer filter the waste and excess fluid from your body. 
When your blood pressure rises, your heart is working harder to pump blood to the rest of your body. This may lead to heart failure or a heart attack, especially in people with heart disease. Furthermore, the extra force exerted by blood may cause blood vessels to burst, resulting in bleeding. Blood vessels in the brain are especially likely to rupture, which can lead to a stroke.
The act of taking your own blood pressure won’t lower it, but getting to know your numbers can help you better understand what’s healthy and what’s not for you. “The first time patients have a high blood pressure reading in the doctor’s office, we don’t usually start treating right way,” says Dr. Goldberg. That’s because individual readings can vary, especially in potentially high-stress situations like a doctor’s visit.
You can lower your systolic blood pressure (the top number) by switching to the DASH diet. The DASH diet is based on 2,000 calories a day. It's rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products. It's also low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and total fat. According to studies, adopting a DASH diet can reduce systolic blood pressure by eight to 14 points. The goal is to keep you blood pressure goal is less than 120/80.  
Talk to your doctor about adding supplements to your diet. Check with your doctor to see whether a natural remedy may help lower your blood pressure. Many natural remedies have scientific evidence to show that they can lower high blood pressure, but you should never attempt to replace your blood pressure medication without talking with your doctor.[16]
4. Cut down on processed food. Just about all processed foods contain huge amounts of fructose, particularly fruit drinks or any fruit-flavored products. Fructose is hidden all over the supermarket, even in the most unlikely places: processed meats, breads, pasta sauces and dressings. Fast food chains love fructose. The only thing they love more is vegetable oil.
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