1. Concentrate on foods that lower blood pressure. Sugary, processed foods contain salt, sugar, damaged fats, and food sensitivities like gluten that contribute to or exacerbate high blood pressure. Shifting to a whole, unprocessed foods diet can dramatically impact your blood pressure. Many whole, unprocessed foods are rich in potassium, a mineral that supports healthy blood pressure. Some research shows that too much sodium and low amounts of potassium – can contribute to high blood pressure. Research shows people with high blood pressure can benefit from increased potassium in foods including avocado, spinach, wild-caught salmon, and sweet potatoes.

One of the top causes for heart disease is high blood pressure. High blood pressure is one condition which might not show any symptoms for a really long time. This is the most dangerous aspect about high blood pressure, given the number of diseases that it can cause. However, you must know that a few lifestyle changes can be really helpful in keeping your blood pressure under control. With a little discipline, you can achieve healthy blood pressure. In this article, we talk about some effective remedies which can help in lowering your blood pressure quickly. Keep reading...


3) Coconut water. Rich in potassium, electrolytes, and other important nutrients, coconut water has been shown to help significantly lower blood pressure levels in most of the people that drink it. A recent study published in the West Indian Medical Journal found that drinking coconut water helped 71 percent of participants achieve a significant reduction in systolic pressure, and 29 percent of participants achieve a significant reduction in diastolic pressure. The results were even more amplified when participants drank both coconut water and mauby, a tropical drink made from buckthorn tree bark.
I would not recommend changing BP medications every 3-4 months just to prevent the onset of potential side-effects, but it certainly makes sense to reassess how you are doing on a BP med after a certain interval (usually after a few weeks, and then every few months or more often if the dose still needs to be refined or if there is concern about potential side-effects).
Perhaps you’ve never given much thought to your blood pressure, especially if it’s been spot on for most of your life. But as you get older and deal with more stressful aspects of in life, it can affect your blood pressure. Maybe not quite high enough to require medication, but it may be something to keep an eye on it. And this can affect even those who eat well, exercise most days, and do all the right things to stay healthy.

Unlike the smooth action of the hot tub pump, the human heart expands and contracts mightily each second or so, causing your blood pressure to be comparatively high one moment, and comparatively low in the next. That is why we need two measurements when checking your blood pressure: one at the moment when the pressure is highest (your systolic blood pressure), and one a moment later, when the pressure is lowest (your diastolic blood pressure).


I am a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with hbp about 5 years ago. I also have degenerative arthritis in my hips, in particular,and have had to keep up with strength training exercises over the past 20 years to ward off the pain. When first diagnosed with hpb, my doctor put me on Benicar. It helped immediately but I also began to experience some severe muscle and joint pain in my hips and legs. She switched me to Valsartan and the pain abided for about 2 months. Then came back again. Fast forward to last fall when I had a left hip replacement. Recovery was slow, especially for my age. I kept stumping the PT as to why my muscle tension was so tight. Finally, after I started working out at the gym, my pain resided. Counter intuitive, I know. Now I am scheduled to have a right hip replacement in November 2018 and am experiencing intermittent excruciating pain in my quads and tibia. I’ve been reading about an uncommon side effect of bp meds being muscle and joint pain. I’m wondering how much the bp meds are contributing to my pain. Would it be unreasonable to try switching bp meds every 3/4 months? Thank you for any advice you can provide.
Regular visits with your doctor are also key to controlling your blood pressure. If your blood pressure is well-controlled, check with your doctor about how often you need to check it. Your doctor may suggest checking it daily or less often. If you're making any changes in your medications or other treatments, your doctor may recommend you check your blood pressure starting two weeks after treatment changes and a week before your next appointment.
You didn’t mention that almost all blood pressure meds cause blood sugar to rise which is a real problem if you are pre-diabetic and trying hard to keep your numbers down so that you won’t have to take diabetic meds. My husband’s BP meds make him feel bad and make his blood sugar rise. If he stops the BP meds he feels great but his BP goes up. Happens on each BP med he’s taken.
My BP since in my 30’s has been 135/75. I am 72 and last June it was averaging 160/70. I joined WW and lost 35 lbs but my home readings (BP monitor checked with doctor’s) 150-160/65-70. However, at doctors office it went from 170-145/75. I am planning to home monitor twice per day this next week. Another concern, my doctor is not concerned enough to put me on a hypertension pill. Isn’t 140 and above alarming? Health wise, my other health readings are all normal or below…..cholesterol, diabetes, plaque in arteries, etc.
4. Find an exercise that works for you (and do it). Moving more can help reverse high blood pressure. One meta-analysis of 65 studies found regular exercise provides both an acute and longer-term reduction in blood pressure. Whether you’re an exercise novice or a conditioned athlete, these four strategies can help you create an effective workout plan to optimize health.
According to the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, the goal of blood pressure treatment is to attain a blood pressure reading that's less than 130/80 mmHg systolic and less than 80mmHg diastolic. In general, if you have hypertension, it is likely that you will need to be treated for the duration of your life to maintain this target blood pressure. 
3. Quit smoking and alcohol: Because, neither of the two is of any benefit to your health. What's more is that smoking is listed as a causative factor for almost all diseases. You name a disease, and smoking will be a contributing factor to it. Alcohol, on the other hand, has direct links with increasing blood pressure. No amount of alcohol intake is safe or healthy for men or women.
When was the last time you thought about your blood pressure? If you're like most people, it probably hasn't been since your doctor mentioned it during your last checkup. But high blood pressure (hypertension) is a serious condition that can lead to life-threatening problems, like heart attack and stroke. The good news is that you can lower your risk of hypertension with lifestyle changes.

8. Take less stress: If you want to stay healthy, take less stress. Every individual faces some kind of difficulty in their life. What matters is the attitude you have towards these difficulties. If you constantly take stress or tension, you are likely to have blood pressure problems. Being chronically stressed puts your body in constant fight-or-flight mode. This could lead to faster heart rate and constricted blood vessels. Listen to good music, do yoga, meditate. These are some effective ways to control your stress and also keep your blood pressure under control.
High blood pressure, or hypertension, is the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Damage to your blood vessels occurs every time your pressure is elevated, and the new guidelines are meant to help people become more aware earlier.  And through earlier awareness, it may help prevent the damage that would occur if you waited for a later diagnosis.
The right tunes can help bring your blood pressure down, according to Italian research. Researchers asked 29 adults who were already taking BP medication to listen to soothing classical, Celtic, or Indian music for 30 minutes daily while breathing slowly. When they followed up with the subjects six months later, their blood pressure had dropped by an average of 4 mmHg.
“I always recommend that people find something that they enjoy doing to stay in shape. For example, line dancing, walking outside, and riding a bike are all good ways to get active,” says Scott Parker, a health and fitness trainer and a national spokesperson for #GoRedGetFit — an online fitness challenge for women hosted by the AHA and Macy’s. “It’s also important to find other people you like doing the activity with, because that helps you stick with it.”
If you make a purchase of a product linked from our website, it is possible that our organization may receive a portion of the final purchase price, through an affiliate program. Your price will not be affected by this. We only share resources that we trust and think may be of value. If you have feedback on any resource we share, we'd love to hear about it.
According to the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, the goal of blood pressure treatment is to attain a blood pressure reading that's less than 130/80 mmHg systolic and less than 80mmHg diastolic. In general, if you have hypertension, it is likely that you will need to be treated for the duration of your life to maintain this target blood pressure. 

This technique is known to surprisingly few health professionals, though it has proved valuable in the treatment of a wide variety of health problems. Recently, this powerful technique has been shown to be an extremely effective method for allowing the body to rapidly normalize high blood pressure more effectively than any other treatment reported in the scientific literature.
Garlic: Garlic has long been thought to reduce hypertension. Studies show that garlic extract can lower blood pressure, although the optimal dose, frequency, and form are not well established. Garlic may produce this effect by acting directly on the kidneys to eliminate excess salt. It is considered a safe spice to consume, although it can cause some stomach upset. 
I am a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with hbp about 5 years ago. I also have degenerative arthritis in my hips, in particular,and have had to keep up with strength training exercises over the past 20 years to ward off the pain. When first diagnosed with hpb, my doctor put me on Benicar. It helped immediately but I also began to experience some severe muscle and joint pain in my hips and legs. She switched me to Valsartan and the pain abided for about 2 months. Then came back again. Fast forward to last fall when I had a left hip replacement. Recovery was slow, especially for my age. I kept stumping the PT as to why my muscle tension was so tight. Finally, after I started working out at the gym, my pain resided. Counter intuitive, I know. Now I am scheduled to have a right hip replacement in November 2018 and am experiencing intermittent excruciating pain in my quads and tibia. I’ve been reading about an uncommon side effect of bp meds being muscle and joint pain. I’m wondering how much the bp meds are contributing to my pain. Would it be unreasonable to try switching bp meds every 3/4 months? Thank you for any advice you can provide. 

High blood pressure, a potentially dangerous health condition also known as hypertension, is quite common in the modern day. One of the most significant issues faced with high blood pressure is the fact that many people do not express obvious symptoms during the earlier stages of this condition. This is why many people refer to hypertension as a silent killer. Realizing what causes blood pressure to become elevated, identifying the symptoms and becoming educated about particular techniques that can help to reduce blood pressure levels quickly is essential to avoid the dangerous complications of this condition. In one study, over 70% of all participants had elevated blood pressure levels, causing a need formore adequate education on making the worldwide population more aware of the condition.


Perhaps you’ve never given much thought to your blood pressure, especially if it’s been spot on for most of your life. But as you get older and deal with more stressful aspects of in life, it can affect your blood pressure. Maybe not quite high enough to require medication, but it may be something to keep an eye on it. And this can affect even those who eat well, exercise most days, and do all the right things to stay healthy.

Editor’s Note: Considerable controversy exists about whether fat or cholesterol are, per se, drivers of atherosclerosis. They are implicated in some studies, while others indicate that quality of fat, and placement in a wider dietary pattern, may be more significant to ultimate impact. What seems clear, however, is that a diet high in animal products, sugar, and processed foods is often a recipe for high blood pressure and heart disease.

Sipping on not one but four cups of tea daily can help control blood pressure. A study presented at the European Society of Hyper tension in Milan found those who avoided coffee and tea consumption all together had the highest rates of blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Those who drank tea the most often, between one to four cups a day, had the lowest systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings, as well as the lowest pulse pressure and heart rate. Pinkies up, for your blood pressure’s sake.
I am a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with hbp about 5 years ago. I also have degenerative arthritis in my hips, in particular,and have had to keep up with strength training exercises over the past 20 years to ward off the pain. When first diagnosed with hpb, my doctor put me on Benicar. It helped immediately but I also began to experience some severe muscle and joint pain in my hips and legs. She switched me to Valsartan and the pain abided for about 2 months. Then came back again. Fast forward to last fall when I had a left hip replacement. Recovery was slow, especially for my age. I kept stumping the PT as to why my muscle tension was so tight. Finally, after I started working out at the gym, my pain resided. Counter intuitive, I know. Now I am scheduled to have a right hip replacement in November 2018 and am experiencing intermittent excruciating pain in my quads and tibia. I’ve been reading about an uncommon side effect of bp meds being muscle and joint pain. I’m wondering how much the bp meds are contributing to my pain. Would it be unreasonable to try switching bp meds every 3/4 months? Thank you for any advice you can provide.
Much of the salt we ingest comes from fast food, ready-made meals, bread and soft drinks – things to avoid when on a low-carbohydrate diet. This will lower your salt intake automatically. Furthermore, the hormonal effects of LCHF make it easier for the body to dispose of excess salt through urine; this can explain the slight lowering of blood pressure.
Pickering TG, et al. Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: Part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans: a statement for professionals from the Subcommittee of Professional and Public Education of the American Heart Association Council on High Blood Pressure Research. Hypertension. 2005 Jan;45(1):142-61.
Add olive oil to your blood pressure shopping list. The main reason for this benefit is because of polyphenols. These compounds are known for fighting inflammation and reducing blood pressure, according to UCDavis. That’s why olive oil is a key part of the DASH diet and one of the foods that lower blood pressure. Next, check out the 11 things you need to know about the DASH diet. 
Speaking of BP meds that effect potassium, my potassium is usually around 3.3 which is below the threshold. My doctor thinks this is due to the diuretic chlorthalidone and recommends a supplement like KLOR. I also take lisinopril and amlodipine. I have no symptoms of hypoglycemia and have put off taking the supplement. Perhaps switching to a potassium sparing diuretic would be the way to go, but I tolerate my current meds very well. I am a very active 75 year old man. Thank you so much for your good work with this blog.
All medications come with a risk of side effects, so why take them if you don’t have to? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about seven out of 10 U.S. adults with high blood pressure use medications to treat their condition. But what many people don’t realize is that you can help control your blood pressure naturally by changing a few daily habits.
Elevating your feet will not lower blood pressure and will actually increase the blood pressure reading when your feet are higher than your heart. On the other hand, if you are doing activities to relieve stress such as yoga (which often elevates your legs, such as legs-up-the-wall pose), then over the long run, these stress reducing activities may help to decrease your blood pressure (but it is not the act of elevating the legs that is lowering the blood pressure it is the stress relieving activity).
Glad you’ve found the information here helpful. Sounds like you are being very thoughtful and proactive about maintaining your health. Wonderful that your Medicare plan is covering an exercise program with a trainer! It’s true that as one gets older, being more deliberate and purposeful about exercise and strength work becomes more important. good luck and take care!
About 80 million Americans over age 20, 1 in 3 adults, have high blood pressure, and many don’t even know they have it. Not treating high blood pressure is dangerous. High blood pressure increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. You can live a healthier life if you treat and manage it! There are many ways to do so, taking natural remedies is just one of them.
Many factors can cause your blood pressure to rise, and each factor may or may not require medication. Many people make lifestyle changes that lower their blood pressure without medication; especially for pre-hypertension and stage 1 of hypertension. Also, each time you take your blood pressure, make sure you are still and calm, sitting with both feet on the floor, arm supported on a flat surface, and you are measuring at the same time everyday. You can also take multiple readings in one sitting, but wait one minute between each reading. These steps will ensure you are providing your healthcare provider with the most accurate blood pressure reading!
Omega-3 fatty acids, such as those found in fish oil supplements, offer a wide variety of health benefits, including the ability to reduce blood pressure by reducing LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol. It is possible to consume enough Omega-3 fatty acids simply by adding more fatty fish to your diet, but it’s much easier to take it in supplement form. The best forms of Omega-3 oil are krill and calamari oils.
Mildly or moderately elevated blood pressure will rarely give obvious symptoms (a light headache might occur sometimes). A very high blood pressure can give severe headaches, fatigue and nausea. High blood pressure is the result of an increased amount of liquid and salt in the blood, and also of the blood vessel walls being thicker and harder than normal.
Also common for the pulse to increase when the systolic blood pressure goes down, that is the heart compensating for low BP. In your case, it may or may not be an indication that your body is finding a systolic BP of 100 to be on the low side. I would consider a systolic BP of 100 to be low for someone on BP medications; there are a few medical conditions that warrant a lower BP but for garden-variety essential hypertension, I’m not aware of any randomized studies that have demonstrated better outcomes at such a lower SBP.
1) Raw almonds. Eating just a handful of truly raw almonds every day can make a significant difference in keeping your blood pressure levels in check. A key component of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, also known as DASH, raw almonds are rich in monounsaturated fats, which have been scientifically proven to help lower blood cholesterol levels, reduce arterial inflammation, and ultimately lower blood pressure levels.
This cruciferous veggie is a good source of the blood pressure-regulating minerals magnesium, calcium, and potassium. In fact, high amounts of those three minerals is a telltale sign of many foods to lower blood pressure. Previous research in animals has found that a diet high in broccoli sprouts may help reduce blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. Broccoli sprouts are high in compounds that may help reduce damage to arteries, which may play a role in high blood pressure.
As blood pressure tends to vary somewhat from day to day, it’s recommended to only diagnose someone with high blood pressure if they have given a repeatedly high reading. If the average of either of the readings (either the systolic or diastolic) is higher than the norm, it will be considered an elevated blood pressure. That is, an average of 150/85 or 135/100 over readings on several occassions will be considered too high.
Dear Dr. Kernisan, you don’t know how thrilled I am to hear back from you!! There seems to be so little kindness these days that I so appreciate your caring response. I have had little success finding information about malignant hypertension. You mentioned following up was a lot of work, but it has been so consuming for me due to my fear, but also trying for a decent quality of life with as few side effects as possible, that my daughter says I need to find something else to do. (I have no other family left)…Besides a very stressful job, and caregiving for my mother who lived to be 97, I have always done volunteer work, so am really ready to get back to being productive…As far as my malignant spikes, I have asked every doctor and no one has an answer as to why it suddenly developed. That is one reason it is so scary. The nephrologist says he guesses it was from years of chronic stress. All the tests (kidney and carotid artery) were negative. I do a ton of research and am so glad to have found your site!! I found you through a link in a Washington Post article by Janice Neumann on August 17 “New Blood Pressure Guidelines Can Cause Problems for the Elderly”… I did not find a way to contact her. I have had no luck finding similar patients but need to learn social media skills. Thank you again so much!!!! I will be a faithful follower from now on!!! Best Regards, Kathy
Flavanols an anti-inflammatory and heart-protective antioxidant found in raw cacao may protect against cardiovascular disease, reduce the risk of stroke, and help improve blood circulation. Thus lowering your blood pressure. Cacao contains over 700 compounds and the complex antioxidants found in it known as polyphenols help reduce ‘bad cholesterol’ and prevent hardening of the arteries.
“I always recommend that people find something that they enjoy doing to stay in shape. For example, line dancing, walking outside, and riding a bike are all good ways to get active,” says Scott Parker, a health and fitness trainer and a national spokesperson for #GoRedGetFit — an online fitness challenge for women hosted by the AHA and Macy’s. “It’s also important to find other people you like doing the activity with, because that helps you stick with it.”
Sipping on not one but four cups of tea daily can help control blood pressure. A study presented at the European Society of Hyper tension in Milan found those who avoided coffee and tea consumption all together had the highest rates of blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Those who drank tea the most often, between one to four cups a day, had the lowest systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings, as well as the lowest pulse pressure and heart rate. Pinkies up, for your blood pressure’s sake.
Editor’s Note: Considerable controversy exists about whether fat or cholesterol are, per se, drivers of atherosclerosis. They are implicated in some studies, while others indicate that quality of fat, and placement in a wider dietary pattern, may be more significant to ultimate impact. What seems clear, however, is that a diet high in animal products, sugar, and processed foods is often a recipe for high blood pressure and heart disease.

The right tunes can help bring your blood pressure down, according to Italian research. Researchers asked 29 adults who were already taking BP medication to listen to soothing classical, Celtic, or Indian music for 30 minutes daily while breathing slowly. When they followed up with the subjects six months later, their blood pressure had dropped by an average of 4 mmHg.
2. Ayurveda Die: Improper diet also contributes towards the unhealthy condition of the body. Eat a balanced diet and avoid the consumption of salt and sugar, pickles, alcohol, caffeine, tomatoes, and fatty foods to regulate high BP. Include ginger, green leafy veggies, yogurt, berries, oatmeal, onion, amla, Omega-3 fatty acid, beetroot, Vitamin C rich fruits, herbs, garlic, seeds, cucumber, bananas, pomegranate, nuts, avocados and olive oil, in your meals.
Caffeine can raise blood pressure by tightening blood vessels and magnifying the effects of stress, says James Lane, PhD, a Duke University researcher who studies caffeine and cardiovascular health. "When you're under stress, your heart starts pumping a lot more blood, boosting blood pressure," he says. "And caffeine exaggerates that effect." (Not sure whether you need to cut back? Here are 6 physical symptoms that mean you're drinking too much coffee.) 

8. Take less stress: If you want to stay healthy, take less stress. Every individual faces some kind of difficulty in their life. What matters is the attitude you have towards these difficulties. If you constantly take stress or tension, you are likely to have blood pressure problems. Being chronically stressed puts your body in constant fight-or-flight mode. This could lead to faster heart rate and constricted blood vessels. Listen to good music, do yoga, meditate. These are some effective ways to control your stress and also keep your blood pressure under control.
And I am 67 and am on HCTZ25mg (I retain a lot of water) and Losartan 75mg which causes leg cramps but I think I am experiencing angina – not always; it goes away after the initial pain – now I’m worried – yes I could lose weight but do not smoke(17yrs ago) or drink(used to then stopped now for a number of years). What’s are next move. Iam adopted so I can’t look to my Mom for any genetics…Thank you, Laurie
Developed thousands of years ago in India, Ayurveda is the sister philosophy of yoga, the medication form of it. The therapies and treatments work after the identification of an individual’s Dosha- Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. Dosha imbalance is the foremost reason for any health issues and hypertension is the result of the imbalance of the two doshas- Vata and Pitta.

Glad to be helpful. If the nephrologist says all the tests were negative, that sounds reassuring and might mean your doctors could try different types of BP medication with you. Generally, three types of medication are considered equally acceptable for first-line treatment of high blood pressure: thiazide-type diuretics, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (these two are related), or calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine.


I am a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with hbp about 5 years ago. I also have degenerative arthritis in my hips, in particular,and have had to keep up with strength training exercises over the past 20 years to ward off the pain. When first diagnosed with hpb, my doctor put me on Benicar. It helped immediately but I also began to experience some severe muscle and joint pain in my hips and legs. She switched me to Valsartan and the pain abided for about 2 months. Then came back again. Fast forward to last fall when I had a left hip replacement. Recovery was slow, especially for my age. I kept stumping the PT as to why my muscle tension was so tight. Finally, after I started working out at the gym, my pain resided. Counter intuitive, I know. Now I am scheduled to have a right hip replacement in November 2018 and am experiencing intermittent excruciating pain in my quads and tibia. I’ve been reading about an uncommon side effect of bp meds being muscle and joint pain. I’m wondering how much the bp meds are contributing to my pain. Would it be unreasonable to try switching bp meds every 3/4 months? Thank you for any advice you can provide.
×