If you are in this 130/80 range, reducing your blood pressure can help protect you from heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, eye disease, and even cognitive decline. The goal of the new guidelines is to encourage you to treat your high blood pressure seriously and to take action to bring it down, primarily using lifestyle interventions. "It is well documented that lifestyle changes can lower blood pressure as much as pills can, and sometimes even more," says Dr. Fisher.
Eat berries. Berries have many health benefits, and one of them is improving blood pressure and reducing other heart disease risks. Berries, like strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries, have lots of polyphenols, which are great for your heart. They’re also really tasty. So, load up on the berries for better blood pressure. If you don’t like eating them all the time, try adding them to a smoothie made with low-fat or fat-free yogurt without added sugar. Throw in some ice, banana, and low-fat milk for a heart-healthy treat.

If you think eggs are not heart healthy, you should know that past studies have shown that yolks don’t raise heart disease risk. Now, recent research has found that egg whites deserve a place on the list of foods to lower blood pressure, according to a study presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. As MensHealth.com reported, when rats with high blood pressure were fed a protein found in egg whites, they experienced a drop in blood pressure that was comparable to a low dose of Captopril, a blood-pressure-lowering medication. Although more research is needed, eggs are a solid source of protein, vitamin D, and other healthy nutrients.
“I always recommend that people find something that they enjoy doing to stay in shape. For example, line dancing, walking outside, and riding a bike are all good ways to get active,” says Scott Parker, a health and fitness trainer and a national spokesperson for #GoRedGetFit — an online fitness challenge for women hosted by the AHA and Macy’s. “It’s also important to find other people you like doing the activity with, because that helps you stick with it.”
Glad you’ve found the information here helpful. Sounds like you are being very thoughtful and proactive about maintaining your health. Wonderful that your Medicare plan is covering an exercise program with a trainer! It’s true that as one gets older, being more deliberate and purposeful about exercise and strength work becomes more important. good luck and take care!
Well, it is common for people’s BP to be higher in the office, but if it’s higher in the evenings at well, you could certainly discuss changing your BP management with your doctor. I would recommend that you discuss further with your doctor. Specifically, you may want to ask your doctor why your BP seems to be higher in the evening, and what your goal should be for your home BP readings. You could also try changing the time of day you take your amlodipine, to see if that changes your daily BP pattern.
Eat beets: Rich in vitamins and minerals, this root vegetable can help decrease blood pressure. A 2010 study in hypertension found that drinking only 250ml of juice was needed have a positive effect on blood pressure. Many of the participants saw lowered blood pressure within 24 hours. Another study from 2012 saw that beetroot juice helped lower systolic blood pressure.
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