Coconut water: A great beverage on hot days, coconut water is rich in minerals and nutrients. It contains many electrolytes essential for the body, such as potassium, and has been shown to significantly lower blood pressure in most people who drink it. A study published in West Indian Medical Journal found that drinking coconut water helped 71 percent of participants achieve a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure, and 29 percent of participants achieves a significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified the genes responsible for aortic ballooning and the sequence of events leading to aortic aneurysms. Dr. Hal Dietz currently conducts clinical trials of therapies for people with inherited aortic aneurysms to improve health and quality of life for these patients.Learn more about Dr. Deitz and his aortic ballooning therapies.
When added to a healthy diet, almonds can help influence lower blood pressure levels. In fact, almonds are included in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — DASH — Diet. In the diet, almonds are included in the “nuts, seeds and legumes” group. The diet recommends eating four to five servings of this food group per week. With regard to almonds, one serving of almonds is just one-third cup. The healthy monounsaturated fat in almonds contributes to lower blood cholesterol levels and reduced arterial inflammation, which ultimately helps lower the pressure inside the arteries.
Reduce your fat and sugar intake: Maintaining a healthy weight for your body type helps keep blood pressure under control. It has been proven that losing excess weight can drastically lower blood pressure values. When obesity and hypertension are coupled together, it can lead to some dangerous long-term health effects that could eventually be fatal in the long run. It is estimated that about 36.5 Americans are obese, with the consumption of excessive amounts of sugar being the main culprit. It is important to make weight loss a priority when treating your high blood pressure.
The causes are most often some combination of clogged “pipes” and excessive salt in the diet. Lifestyle changes, such as appropriate diet and exercise, are among the most effective treatment strategies for high blood pressure. Relaxation, meditation, and otherwise “taking it easy” are not effective solutions, as valuable as such strategies may be for your psychological well-being.
Sipping on not one but four cups of tea daily can help control blood pressure. A study presented at the European Society of Hyper tension in Milan found those who avoided coffee and tea consumption all together had the highest rates of blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Those who drank tea the most often, between one to four cups a day, had the lowest systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings, as well as the lowest pulse pressure and heart rate. Pinkies up, for your blood pressure’s sake.
Lowering your blood pressure requires more than just cutting back on sodium, Prevention.com reports. You also need to eat foods high in at least two of these three minerals: calcium, magnesium, and potassium. With white beans, you get the jackpot for all three. Just one cup contains 13 percent of the calcium, 30 percent of the magnesium, and 24 percent of the potassium needed for your daily recommended servings. Here are 7 things your doctor isn’t telling you about your blood pressure.
Pickering TG, et al. Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: Part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans: a statement for professionals from the Subcommittee of Professional and Public Education of the American Heart Association Council on High Blood Pressure Research. Hypertension. 2005 Jan;45(1):142-61.
Some examples of aerobic exercise you may try to lower blood pressure include walking, jogging, cycling, swimming or dancing. You can also try high-intensity interval training, which involves alternating short bursts of intense activity with subsequent recovery periods of lighter activity. Strength training also can help reduce blood pressure. Aim to include strength training exercises at least two days a week. Talk to your doctor about developing an exercise program.
Lowering your blood pressure requires more than just cutting back on sodium, Prevention.com reports. You also need to eat foods high in at least two of these three minerals: calcium, magnesium, and potassium. With white beans, you get the jackpot for all three. Just one cup contains 13 percent of the calcium, 30 percent of the magnesium, and 24 percent of the potassium needed for your daily recommended servings. Here are 7 things your doctor isn’t telling you about your blood pressure.
Too much booze is known to raise blood pressure. But having just a little bit could do the opposite. Light to moderate drinking (defined as one drink or fewer per day) is associated with a lower risk for hypertension in women, according to research from Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Moderate drinking could play a role in heart disease prevention too, studies show.

A SBP above 140 is not “alarming” per se, but historically this has been the cutoff separating “high” blood pressure from normal or “bordeline” blood pressure. Many doctors do still believe that older adults should be encouraged to get their SBP below 140, and in the SPRINT blood pressure trial, one group of participants actually aimed to get their SBP below 120.
Explore the articles below to learn more about blood pressure control and healthy living, and to start developing your own personal guide to lowering blood pressure. Even better, book a health vacation at Pritikin, recently described by The New York Times as the “granddaddy of health-based wellness spas.” Make a personal investment in what matters most – a longer life, a better life.
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It is notable that relaxation and meditation, though useful for many purposes, have not been found to impact high blood pressure. Many people find this surprising, possibly since high blood pressure also is known as “hypertension.” Because of this potentially misleading term, many people have assumed that high levels of stress or “tension” are a major cause of “hypertension,” or high blood pressure. This is not the case. High blood pressure is an essentially mechanical, and not psychological, problem.
(NaturalNews) High blood pressure is no longer just an affliction of the elderly, as more than one-third of young people between the ages of 16 and 34 are now said to suffer from some form of hypertension. And a recent study out of California revealed that, if left unchecked, this cardiovascular malady, even in its mild form, can lead to premature aging and brain damage.
Speaking of BP meds that effect potassium, my potassium is usually around 3.3 which is below the threshold. My doctor thinks this is due to the diuretic chlorthalidone and recommends a supplement like KLOR. I also take lisinopril and amlodipine. I have no symptoms of hypoglycemia and have put off taking the supplement. Perhaps switching to a potassium sparing diuretic would be the way to go, but I tolerate my current meds very well. I am a very active 75 year old man. Thank you so much for your good work with this blog.
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