What is considered low depends a bit on the person, their medical history, and the particular circumstances. It is also important to compare a person’s blood pressure to his or her “usual blood pressure.” A SBP of 102 is different in a young woman who usually has SBP 100-105, compared to an older person who has historically registered SBPs of 130-150.
Another important step is to lose weight and maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight elevates your risk for high blood pressure and many other diseases and conditions. Losing just 5 percent of your body weight can have a significant positive impact on your blood pressure. Studies have shown that the combination of exercising and losing weight improves blood pressure numbers even more than either one alone. It may seem daunting to lose weight, but it is possible. Talk to your doctor about how other people have done it. And consider seeing a weight loss counselor too. You can do this! And after only a few pounds of healthy weight loss, you should start seeing your blood pressure numbers drop.
Glad to be helpful. If the nephrologist says all the tests were negative, that sounds reassuring and might mean your doctors could try different types of BP medication with you. Generally, three types of medication are considered equally acceptable for first-line treatment of high blood pressure: thiazide-type diuretics, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (these two are related), or calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine.
The calculated difference between the systolic and diastolic pressures is also of interest. If the difference is large (e.g. 170/85), it could be the sign of stiff arteries – often caused by heart disease. This means the blood vessels can’t dilate enough when the heart sends out a pulse, which forces the blood pressure to increase. (The walls can’t expand, so the pressure rises when the heart tries to pump the blood through.)
Your circulatory system is very much like the hot tub’s. Your blood is like the water. Your heart is like the pump, and your blood vessels are like the pipes. Your heart pumps your blood through the circulatory system in order to feed oxygen and nutrients to cells throughout your body, and to remove waste products. By circulating through the system, your blood is filtered and re-utilized, again and again.
Common painkillers (so-called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAID), can increase your blood pressure by inhibiting the production of salt in your kidneys. This includes over-the-counter pills such as Ipren, Ibumetin, Ibuprofen, Diklofenak and Naproxen as well as the prescription drug Celebra. Painkillers with the active substance paracetamol are better for your blood pressure.
About 80 million Americans over age 20, 1 in 3 adults, have high blood pressure, and many don’t even know they have it. Not treating high blood pressure is dangerous. High blood pressure increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. You can live a healthier life if you treat and manage it! There are many ways to do so, taking natural remedies is just one of them. 

Eat potassium- and magnesium-rich foods. Potassium can help regulate your heart rate and can reduce the effect that sodium has on your blood pressure. Foods like bananas, melons, oranges, apricots, avocados, dairy, leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, tuna, salmon, beans, nuts, and seeds have lots of potassium.  Magnesium is thought to help blood vessels relax, making it easier for blood to pass through. Foods rich in magnesium include vegetables, dairy, chicken, legumes, and whole grains. It’s better to get vitamins and minerals from food, and a heart-healthy diet like the one we described above is a good way to ensure you get plenty of nutrients. However, you may want to talk to your doctor about whether taking certain supplements might help your blood pressure.
Results from SPRINT suggest that if you’re similar to the SPRINT participants, you may experience additional benefits by aiming for a systolic BP close to 120. If you’re considering this, be sure to read my article explaining SPRINT and related research, so that you’ll have a clear understanding of how likely you are to benefit (at best, an estimated 1 in 27 chance based on the research) and what are the risks and burdens.
Stress hormones constrict your blood vessels and can lead to temporary spikes in blood pressure. In addition, over time, stress can trigger unhealthy habits that put your cardiovascular health at risk. These might include overeating, poor sleep, and misusing drugs and alcohol. For all these reasons, reducing stress should be a priority if you're looking to lower your blood pressure.
I am a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with hbp about 5 years ago. I also have degenerative arthritis in my hips, in particular,and have had to keep up with strength training exercises over the past 20 years to ward off the pain. When first diagnosed with hpb, my doctor put me on Benicar. It helped immediately but I also began to experience some severe muscle and joint pain in my hips and legs. She switched me to Valsartan and the pain abided for about 2 months. Then came back again. Fast forward to last fall when I had a left hip replacement. Recovery was slow, especially for my age. I kept stumping the PT as to why my muscle tension was so tight. Finally, after I started working out at the gym, my pain resided. Counter intuitive, I know. Now I am scheduled to have a right hip replacement in November 2018 and am experiencing intermittent excruciating pain in my quads and tibia. I’ve been reading about an uncommon side effect of bp meds being muscle and joint pain. I’m wondering how much the bp meds are contributing to my pain. Would it be unreasonable to try switching bp meds every 3/4 months? Thank you for any advice you can provide.
Eat beets: Rich in vitamins and minerals, this root vegetable can help decrease blood pressure. A 2010 study in hypertension found that drinking only 250ml of juice was needed have a positive effect on blood pressure. Many of the participants saw lowered blood pressure within 24 hours. Another study from 2012 saw that beetroot juice helped lower systolic blood pressure.
Ocean Robbins is the author of 31-Day Food Revolution: Heal Your Body, Feel Great, and Transform Your World (Grand Central Life & Style, February 5, 2019). He is the CEO and co-founder of the 500,000+ member Food Revolution Network. He's served as the adjunct professor for Chapman University. And he's received numerous awards, including the national Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service and the Freedom's Flame Award. Ocean Robbins
I just found this site while reading the Washington Post article, and I so hope there is some help for me. I will be 71 in a couple of weeks. I am a congenital heart survivor, having surgical repair by Dr. Cooley in 1960 at the age of 12. I learned a few years ago that I have a “showering” of micro hemorrhages in my brain from the heart lung machine not being “neuroprotective”… That news was shocking and traumatizing. As a child I expected to die. Both my young brothers died of other congenital illnesses. At any rate that apparently puts me at higher than normal stroke risk.
Cayenne Pepper is probably the fastest way to lower high blood pressure. Cayenne pepper is a powerful vasodilator, which means it helps expand blood vessels and improve blood flow. This effect naturally lowers blood pressure levels by increasing the rate at which blood flows throughout the circulatory system, which in turn takes some of the pressure off arterial walls. Either mix one teaspoon of cayenne pepper with half a cup of lukewarm water or mix two tablespoons of raw organic honey with two teaspoons of cayenne pepper; boil them with eight ounces of water and drink when it is warm. A side note: Be careful how many Scoville Units your cayenne pepper is. I bought mine, 90,000 Scoville Units, and OMG. I thought I was going to breathe fire.
Arteries are naturally flexible and smooth, which allows blood to easily move throughout the body. High blood pressure creates extra force against the artery walls, which damages the lining of the arteries. As they become narrower and harder, this restricts blood flow, and when blood flow is lowered, the heart has to work harder to pump it through the body, which only makes the problem worse. 

Also common for the pulse to increase when the systolic blood pressure goes down, that is the heart compensating for low BP. In your case, it may or may not be an indication that your body is finding a systolic BP of 100 to be on the low side. I would consider a systolic BP of 100 to be low for someone on BP medications; there are a few medical conditions that warrant a lower BP but for garden-variety essential hypertension, I’m not aware of any randomized studies that have demonstrated better outcomes at such a lower SBP.

High blood pressure over an extended period can lead to potentially dangerous complications. This can cause damage to organs, leading to microalbuminuria, cognitive dysfunction, and left-ventricular hypertrophy, as noted by one study. Additionally, the risk of renal failure, dementia and suffering a heart attack also dramatically increases in the population with elevated blood pressure levels.


Mildly or moderately elevated blood pressure will rarely give obvious symptoms (a light headache might occur sometimes). A very high blood pressure can give severe headaches, fatigue and nausea. High blood pressure is the result of an increased amount of liquid and salt in the blood, and also of the blood vessel walls being thicker and harder than normal.
One of the top causes for heart disease is high blood pressure. High blood pressure is one condition which might not show any symptoms for a really long time. Read here to know some effective ways to control your blood pressure.  By: DoctorNDTV  Updated: Oct 24, 2018 09:26 IST 4-Min Read  SHARES High blood pressure can be controlled by maintaining a healthy lifestyle
As high blood pressure often goes unnoticed, it’s common for people to live with it unawares for some time. As it’s a risk factor, it may be wise to check your blood pressure every few years, even if you’re feeling healthy in general. This advice is especially directed towards people who are middle-aged or older, as high blood pressure is more common with age.
Stress hormones constrict your blood vessels and can lead to temporary spikes in blood pressure. In addition, over time, stress can trigger unhealthy habits that put your cardiovascular health at risk. These might include overeating, poor sleep, and misusing drugs and alcohol. For all these reasons, reducing stress should be a priority if you're looking to lower your blood pressure.
Eat dark chocolate. Dark chocolate and cocoa powder are both full of heart-healthy plant compounds called flavonoids. Flavonoids are good for you because they cause your blood vessels to dilate, which can help lower blood pressure. Just make sure your chocolate doesn’t have too much sugar. Choose chocolate that is at least 70 percent dark for best results. You can buy individually wrapped chocolate pieces that are the perfect size. Eat one or two a day and enjoy the delicious heart-protective effects.
2. Take an omega-3 oil. Omega 6:3 ratio is important. A lot of us get way too much omega-6 in our diets, which is what's caused the omega-3 craze. Refined vegetable oil is one of the main culprits, and found in almost all processed foods, and even some orange juices. Because we have way too much omega-6 in our systems, we need to compensate by taking some form of omega-3 oil. Decreasing your intake of processed foods will have a similar effect.
Common painkillers (so-called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAID), can increase your blood pressure by inhibiting the production of salt in your kidneys. This includes over-the-counter pills such as Ipren, Ibumetin, Ibuprofen, Diklofenak and Naproxen as well as the prescription drug Celebra. Painkillers with the active substance paracetamol are better for your blood pressure.
Exercise is the soulmate to eating right. You’re more likely to lose weight if you exercise and follow a healthy diet. Official recommendations call for at least half an hour of exercise most days of the week. The effects can be dramatic: Blood pressure drops of 4 to 9 points. Remember that exercise isn’t just going to the gym. It can be gardening, washing your car, or housework. But things that get your heart rate up -- aerobic activities -- like walking, dancing, jogging, riding your bike, and swimming are best for your heart.
Such monitoring provides excellent information for patients and doctors. In fact, research shows that ABPM is a better predictor of future cardiovascular events (e.g. heart attacks, strokes) than conventional office-based BP measurements are. However, ABPM is not yet widely available, since it requires special equipment and may not be covered by insurance. 

Dear Dr. Kernisan, you don’t know how thrilled I am to hear back from you!! There seems to be so little kindness these days that I so appreciate your caring response. I have had little success finding information about malignant hypertension. You mentioned following up was a lot of work, but it has been so consuming for me due to my fear, but also trying for a decent quality of life with as few side effects as possible, that my daughter says I need to find something else to do. (I have no other family left)…Besides a very stressful job, and caregiving for my mother who lived to be 97, I have always done volunteer work, so am really ready to get back to being productive…As far as my malignant spikes, I have asked every doctor and no one has an answer as to why it suddenly developed. That is one reason it is so scary. The nephrologist says he guesses it was from years of chronic stress. All the tests (kidney and carotid artery) were negative. I do a ton of research and am so glad to have found your site!! I found you through a link in a Washington Post article by Janice Neumann on August 17 “New Blood Pressure Guidelines Can Cause Problems for the Elderly”… I did not find a way to contact her. I have had no luck finding similar patients but need to learn social media skills. Thank you again so much!!!! I will be a faithful follower from now on!!! Best Regards, Kathy


Eat berries. Berries have many health benefits, and one of them is improving blood pressure and reducing other heart disease risks. Berries, like strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries, have lots of polyphenols, which are great for your heart. They’re also really tasty. So, load up on the berries for better blood pressure. If you don’t like eating them all the time, try adding them to a smoothie made with low-fat or fat-free yogurt without added sugar. Throw in some ice, banana, and low-fat milk for a heart-healthy treat.
First, keep in mind that drugs have limited success. Most studies on diuretics and other blood pressure-lowering drugs suggest they lower the risk of cardiovascular events among those with blood pressure between 140/90 and 159/99 by 15 to 20%.3 The problem is, with this range of blood pressure, the risk of cardiovascular-related deaths has increased by 300 to 400% compared to people with normal blood pressure.

There are more worrisome facts about medications, notes Dr. Fruge.  Drug treatment frequently has annoying and sometimes dangerous side effects, and never cures the disease.  All too often, blood pressure problems grow progressively worse despite the use of medications.  That’s deeply troubling because hypertension is a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, and premature death.


Flavanols an anti-inflammatory and heart-protective antioxidant found in raw cacao may protect against cardiovascular disease, reduce the risk of stroke, and help improve blood circulation. Thus lowering your blood pressure. Cacao contains over 700 compounds and the complex antioxidants found in it known as polyphenols help reduce ‘bad cholesterol’ and prevent hardening of the arteries.
We've got a bit of a different podcast today for you Guys & Gals, but it's still a goodie, and jam packed with exciting information. The Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences, Dr. Dean Radin, joins us to discuss his expertise on real magic and how can it optimize performance for everyone. Dr. Radin is the author of many books, but his newest, titled Real Magic, delves into the worlds of telepathy and psychokinesis; which he explains may not solely be powers of the imagination. Enjoy!
If you think eggs are not heart healthy, you should know that past studies have shown that yolks don’t raise heart disease risk. Now, recent research has found that egg whites deserve a place on the list of foods to lower blood pressure, according to a study presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. As MensHealth.com reported, when rats with high blood pressure were fed a protein found in egg whites, they experienced a drop in blood pressure that was comparable to a low dose of Captopril, a blood-pressure-lowering medication. Although more research is needed, eggs are a solid source of protein, vitamin D, and other healthy nutrients.
Elevating your feet will not lower blood pressure and will actually increase the blood pressure reading when your feet are higher than your heart. On the other hand, if you are doing activities to relieve stress such as yoga (which often elevates your legs, such as legs-up-the-wall pose), then over the long run, these stress reducing activities may help to decrease your blood pressure (but it is not the act of elevating the legs that is lowering the blood pressure it is the stress relieving activity).
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